Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300

   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #31  
If you are removing too much metal with the grinder then the grinder isn't adjusted correctly. Absolute no reason that the grinder should be removing more metal than a file on the same chain.
Fair statement but still easier to hand file and with any 'grinder' you still have to hand file the rakers, something that a lot of owners overlook. Don't care for them simply because it's easier and quicker to dress a chain on the bar versus removing it and grinding., not that, that is all bad because it gives you a chance to inspect the rails for galling and clean the oil groove and flip the bar if necessary. My rule of thumb is I flip the bar every time I renew the loop and I inspect the drive sprocket at the same time.

Been using chainsaws forever. Still own and use a Stihl 028WB I bought in the early 60's Stihl only made the saw for 2 years. It's an RPM saw and it's loud. Has the heated stirrup on it and no chain brake either. Back then, Stihl had not succumbed to the 'noise police' like today and the saw is all alloy except for the top shroud instead of the plastic of today (like my MS saw). I own an 075 from that era as well but hardly ever use it. Has a 5 foot bar on it with 404 square tooth skip tooth chain. No grinding on that chain, hand setting only and you better use the CR or you'll leave your fingers on the recoil. Tend to run Carleton roller nose bars with replaceable noses and greaseable bearings too. I'm decidedly old school because I AM OLD.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #34  
Fair statement but still easier to hand file and with any 'grinder' you still have to hand file the rakers, something that a lot of owners overlook. Don't care for them simply because it's easier and quicker to dress a chain on the bar versus removing it and grinding., not that, that is all bad because it gives you a chance to inspect the rails for galling and clean the oil groove and flip the bar if necessary. My rule of thumb is I flip the bar every time I renew the loop and I inspect the drive sprocket at the same time.

Been using chainsaws forever. Still own and use a Stihl 028WB I bought in the early 60's Stihl only made the saw for 2 years. It's an RPM saw and it's loud. Has the heated stirrup on it and no chain brake either. Back then, Stihl had not succumbed to the 'noise police' like today and the saw is all alloy except for the top shroud instead of the plastic of today (like my MS saw). I own an 075 from that era as well but hardly ever use it. Has a 5 foot bar on it with 404 square tooth skip tooth chain. No grinding on that chain, hand setting only and you better use the CR or you'll leave your fingers on the recoil. Tend to run Carleton roller nose bars with replaceable noses and greaseable bearings too. I'm decidedly old school because I AM OLD.
Fair enough. I can set my electric sharpener to also due the rakers.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #37  
Fair statement but still easier to hand file and with any 'grinder' you still have to hand file the rakers, something that a lot of owners overlook. Don't care for them simply because it's easier and quicker to dress a chain on the bar versus removing it and grinding., not that, that is all bad because it gives you a chance to inspect the rails for galling and clean the oil groove and flip the bar if necessary. My rule of thumb is I flip the bar every time I renew the loop and I inspect the drive sprocket at the same time.

Been using chainsaws forever. Still own and use a Stihl 028WB I bought in the early 60's Stihl only made the saw for 2 years. It's an RPM saw and it's loud. Has the heated stirrup on it and no chain brake either. Back then, Stihl had not succumbed to the 'noise police' like today and the saw is all alloy except for the top shroud instead of the plastic of today (like my MS saw). I own an 075 from that era as well but hardly ever use it. Has a 5 foot bar on it with 404 square tooth skip tooth chain. No grinding on that chain, hand setting only and you better use the CR or you'll leave your fingers on the recoil. Tend to run Carleton roller nose bars with replaceable noses and greaseable bearings too. I'm decidedly old school because I AM OLD.
I modified the muffler and adjusted the carb on my Stihl. It's loud now too. I wear ear plugs when chainsawing.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #38  
Lot of folks use a dremel and a stone to sharpen teeth as well. I won't do that simply because once a stone gets loaded, it will overheat and take the temper out of the cutting edge of the tooth, whereas a chain grinder won't because it's using a large grinding wheel not a tiny round stone spinning at high rpm. The other issue with using a dremel is holding the correct angle tooth to tooth so the saw cuts straight.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #39  
Lot of folks use a dremel and a stone to sharpen teeth as well. I won't do that simply because once a stone gets loaded, it will overheat and take the temper out of the cutting edge of the tooth, whereas a chain grinder won't because it's using a large grinding wheel not a tiny round stone spinning at high rpm. The other issue with using a dremel is holding the correct angle tooth to tooth so the saw cuts straight.
Both operator errors.

What happens if you aren't holding the "file" to the correct angle tooth to tooth, so the saw cuts straight?

BTW, having the cutters shorter on one side of the bar than the other, is more of the problem of the saw not cutting straight. Also having one side of the bar lower, than the other will cause the same.

SR
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #40  
Looking to sharpen 5-6 chains at a time off the saw.

What would you recommend?
You said "best" and "off the saw" and "Under $300."
There is only one tool that fits these demands.

Use a spare blade and a file.
Mount the blade it in a vice and use chunks of wood between the bottom of the blade and the chain with a wedge for tension.
If you don't have a vice use large C clamps or fab up a wood mount to get it mounted in a fixed position.

ALL and I mean Every stinking chain grinding machine that I've had an opportunity to lay hands on over the years has been pure trash.
I own one and I hate it. It flexes and bends and is never consistent. It burns the chain because it is inconsistent. To stop it from burning I gotta have a squirt bottle of water in one hand and operate it with the other.
I also bought that gold anodized aluminum jig with the little diamond round sharpening bits for use on the chain as well and it's also trash. Did I mention that they are also so agonizingly slow? I mean dead rotting turtle slow.

I had plans to make one - a really solid one from heavy half-inch thick steel but may not realize them as I have discovered a much faster, better, and easier way - - - but it is done with the chain mounted on the saw or a on a spare bar. A Spare Bar works well.

Watching Bucking Billy Ray Smith do his chains I was inspired to use a file. Such a simple skill, and yet so many of us find it intimidating. It's not at all difficult but one does have to do at least three saw teeth on a chain before one realizes how easy it is. Hence the proliferation of pointless jigs and trash machines and videos by countless idiots extolling the virtues of these worthless gizmoes.

I just hand-file them all now. I don't do square grind (that's for green wood) I use a 7/32 Oregon brand fille and get good gullet and my angle is every as consistent as it would be on a good chain grinder, and I Never Burn the chain with grinder heat.
 
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