Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300

   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #52  
I’d like the see all of these hand file users line up their hand filed saws against the same saw with a new factory chain. I’m sure someone is going to say they they can sharpen not only that good but better. Well some people can bench 500 pounds but the average Joe can’t. I’ve watched a lot of people chainsaw and the vast majority of the hand filers are running dull saws. I would bet money that the number of users that could hand file a saw and make it cut good without a guide is in the single digit percentage.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #53  
I’d like the see all of these hand file users line up their hand filed saws against the same saw with a new factory chain. I’m sure someone is going to say they they can sharpen not only that good but better. Well some people can bench 500 pounds but the average Joe can’t. I’ve watched a lot of people chainsaw and the vast majority of the hand filers are running dull saws. I would bet money that the number of users that could hand file a saw and make it cut good without a guide is in the single digit percentage.
The STIHL 2 in 1 is cheating then. It works without any thought at all. It is like $35. I have a RM chain that has been sharpened with the 2 in 1 about 25 times and it cuts like new. I sharpen after each cord. I burn about 15 cords a year.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #54  
Looking to sharpen 5-6 chains at a time off the saw.

What would you recommend?i always use a rat tail file. I also try to keep the chain out of the dirt. Dirt dulls them quickly…
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #55  
I’d like the see all of these hand file users line up their hand filed saws against the same saw with a new factory chain. I’m sure someone is going to say they they can sharpen not only that good but better. Well some people can bench 500 pounds but the average Joe can’t. I’ve watched a lot of people chainsaw and the vast majority of the hand filers are running dull saws. I would bet money that the number of users that could hand file a saw and make it cut good without a guide is in the single digit percentage.
Perhaps we should clarify our terms a bit. When I say "hand file", I mean I am not using a grinder. This could be filing using a gauge or guide or it could be using just a bare file and nothing else. I call that latter "free-hand filing" - using a file with no other guide.

I've said it on here before, but I've met easily more than a hundred people who think they do a great job free-hand filing. I've met just three who actually can do as good or better than a factory new chains when using nothing but a round file. (One was a pro logger, one was a retired machinist. I forget what background the other had). Sadly, I am not one of those people. Frankly, I've not seen any need to develop the free-hand skill. With a decent guide, and a moderate amount of practice, it's not hard to improve on a factory new chain, and get a chain that cuts smoothly and consistently

What some fail to realize is that there is more to sharpening a chain well than just making it more aggressive. I don't want to be fighting the saw all day. Also, cutting a bit faster doesn't do any good if the geometry of the chain is such that it won't hold up well. (this is especially especially noticeable when cutting the slow-grown hardwoods in our area.)

The two types of sharpening guides I've had good luck with (fast, easy to use, and get reliably good results):

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I've also used the Pferd Chainsharp CSX and the Stihl 2 in 1 (which is just a relabeled Pferd guide). They have an advantage that they are faster, since they set the depth gauge at the same time you are sharpening. The disadvantage is that their method of setting the depth guages is not progressive, requiring that you match the lengths of the cutters when sharpening for best performance. Contrary to popular belief, it is not necessary to match the length of the cutters if you use a progressive tool for setting the depth gauges. (but that's a subject for another post - one which I have already made here on TBN several times).
 
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   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #57  
I’d like the see all of these hand file users line up their hand filed saws against the same saw with a new factory chain. I’m sure someone is going to say they they can sharpen not only that good but better. Well some people can bench 500 pounds but the average Joe can’t. I’ve watched a lot of people chainsaw and the vast majority of the hand filers are running dull saws. I would bet money that the number of users that could hand file a saw and make it cut good without a guide is in the single digit percentage.
I am a professorial sawyer and sharpen via hand held file every day. No I can't do as nice as new but good enough to keep working without replacing the chain. If I really ding it bad I will change it out and have it pro ground. I go into the field with multiple files and etra sharp chains. Chips are your freind.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #58  
You can set the grinder to remove as little metal as you want. Just because it’s a grinder doesn’t mean it has to be aggressive.
Depends on who is grinding them. You have them ground, you can bet they will remove a lot of tooth for the reasons I stated in post 45.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #59  
My square cut skip tooth chipper has to be hand sharpened, no exceptions and considering the bar is 5 foot long, it's a lot of filing.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpener under $300 #60  
I love my HF sharpener. It does a better job than I've ever been able to do with a file. I don't believe it takes an excessive amount from the tooth, it takes very little with each motion. As far as I'm concerned, the chains I sharpen cut very close to as well as a new chain. I am somewhat surprised as to how many people have called it junk.
 
 
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