Yanmar tug of war

   / Yanmar tug of war #1  

winston1

Super Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
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5,462
Location
gilmer tx
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Bobcat CT235
Looking for opinions. Here is the senerio. If you hooked a ym1500d and a ym2000 back to back with a chain which one would pull the other backwards? Of course both with no extra weight or implements. And yes, 4 wheel drive is engaged on the 1500 and both can or cannot engage the differential lock as long as they both do the same.

I know a gentleman tractor shopping and he is comparing the two. All other comparisons are out the window. Just want to know which one will win the tug of war. :D
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #2  
Looking for opinions. Here is the senerio. If you hooked a ym1500d and a ym2000 back to back with a chain which one would pull the other backwards? Of course both with no extra weight or implements. And yes, 4 wheel drive is engaged on the 1500 and both can or cannot engage the differential lock as long as they both do the same.

I know a gentleman tractor shopping and he is comparing the two. All other comparisons are out the window. Just want to know which one will win the tug of war. :D
Assuming that they are either both 2WD or 4WD and the tires are the same type the YM2000 will win because of the weight and a few more HP.
The YM2000 weighs 1664#, 164# more than the YM1500 weighs 1500#.
Now if the YM1500D is 4WD and the YM2000 is 2WD the the YM1500 will likely win because of more pull out of the 4 wheels. At least this is my call and I have never been wrong.........today... yet.:D
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #3  
However, we didn't determine which tractor's path has that leaky garden hose from last season. :cool:
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #4  
I can't say for sure, but I can guess tonight, and tell you some experimental results tomorrow!:D

My YM186D is about the same as the 1500, but with smaller tires. I own a YM2000. My 186 is very heavily ballasted, with wheel weights, water filled tires, and suitcase weights. The YM2000 has filled tires and very heavy cast iron wheel weights (About 180 lbs apiece). On smoother surfaces, the 4 wheel drive means the 186 will pull more. In softer terrain, like disking a field, the taller tires means the YM2000 rolls more easily, and will pull the same plow or disk deeper than the 186D can.

I haven't chained them together, but will now, and see. For your friends' purposes, my money would be on the YM1500D. I think the taller tires compared to mine will give it better traction in soft terrain, and the 4 wheel drive an advantage everywhere.
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #5  
Sounds like a totally inane waste of expensive diesel fuel to me.

Reminds me of the 2 idiots that chained their pickups rear to rear and one guy pulled the body off the other.... How stupid.

Guess thats what seperates humans from animals... the ability to think stupid and act it out....:)
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #6  
YM2000.

Both will raise the front off the ground as soon as the chain is pulled tight so 4x4 is irrelevant.

I don't know where that 1664 lbs for YM2000 came from. Maybe the early YM2000, the green one where the hood hinges at the rear.

My YM240 (YM2000) plus the U-Haul trailer it was on (trailer had a tag that said it was 2000 lbs empty), showed 4,950 lbs on a truck scale. Subtract the loader and oversize tires (not ballasted at the time) and it still has to weigh over 2k.

But ... trying this test in the real world is extremely dangerous. Chaining to an immovable object is one of the most dangerous things you can do with a tractor. Real world example: a friend told me that is exactly how his father became handicapped. As a diesel mechanic he tried to move a big trailer with locked brakes, using a little crawler. A D2 or something. The crawler simply walked around inside its tracks like a carnival ride and over backward on him.
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #7  
Reminds me of the 2 idiots that chained their pickups rear to rear and one guy pulled the body off the other.... How stupid.
Yeah. About 3 lifetimes ago I was a Peace Corps Volunteer. In training they said they learned by watching the first groups sent out that it was a mistake to issue vehicles (Wagoneers back then) to Volunteers no matter how remote their site was. Yep, one idiot destroyed a differential in a Wagoneer tug-of-war like that. Your Tax Dollars At Work. :D After the earliest days and partly based on that, nobody ever got a vehicle assigned to them. Let em ride public transit, and maybe wave as the NGO staffs go by in their white Land Cruisers.

That said, I once pulled a County dump truck out of a rough bouldery ford (stream crossing) with my own Wagoneer. It must have outweighed me 3:1. No problem!
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #8  
Guess thats what seperates humans from animals... the ability to think stupid and act it out....:)

Hey...I resemble that remark! :laughing:
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #9  
But ... trying this test in the real world is extremely dangerous. Chaining to an immovable object is one of the most dangerous things you can do with a tractor.

This is definitely true, and not something to try lightly or without consideration and due care to the degree possible.

And, yeah, sometimes I try things just to see what happens. One of my favorite quotes goes something like "Good judgment comes from experience...but a lot of experience comes from bad judgment." But, fooling around with equipment as potentially lethal as tractors is not an arena to have personal experience with bad judgment. It is much better to learn from others' experiences rather than peeing on the electric fence for one's self. Or being disabled or killed.
 
   / Yanmar tug of war #10  
on a loose surface i dont think either would go anywhere. if both were set off with a taut chain both i think would only dig holes or pop a wheelie if they gained traction. i think the HP equation is irrelevant.
 
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