trail clearing technique and tools

   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,061  
Honestly, if I were you, I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for people to step up, it seems in todays world, until a valuable object is missing, most people do not seem to care, sad but true
Damn right.
In MY area, we have ”Conservancies”. They bought up 1000’s of acres of farmland that was going en mass to the developer before our town lost its charm & character. Thank the Lord for those folks. Wealthy people who were also visionary. One in particular was able to raise funds from people in other parts of the country looking for tax write offs, or believed in the preservation of open space enough to pen big checks.

I saw an opening for a private contractor and farmer to fill the void left by all the farmers who got run out of town and seized the opportunity.
Now we, along with the underpaid conservancy’s staff help keep the Conservancy lands mowed, trails cleared and crops farmed to keep our little town looking as close to the way it looked 50 to 300 years ago as possible. Developers have been beaten back by deed restricted open space forever for all to enjoy.

It works, you just need a person who has wealth, vision, and a philanthropic ability to help raise funds. Extremely wealthy people are looking for avenues to tax write offs.
 
   / trail clearing technique and tools
  • Thread Starter
#1,062  
My Stihl dealer suggested that strings will do better if soaked in water so i put some in water for 24 hours (or 48 hour, can't recall which) then put them in a "wet box" to take to work. They did slightly better when cutting these weeds. No tree shoots in here.
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   / trail clearing technique and tools
  • Thread Starter
#1,063  
Also tested a new steel cutting blade for small tress reputed to "can cut thousands acres of trees with". When we cut small trees, there are hundreds of them. That means when you cut one, it falls over and keeps you from seeing others. Keep cutting along as best you can and visibility goes further down and trees you think we cut, are actually 90% off and can't be removed.

Conclusion. Limited use when have a thick growth of trees to remove. Limited usability at best.
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   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,064  
It's been an unusually wet August in Middle Tennessee causing our vegetation to grow to be pretty thick. My experience is a metal blade will cut through thick vegetation faster, but string flails around so much that it chops material into more pieces.

Having seen a rattlesnake in my yard about 1-2 weeks ago, I'm not very motivated to go cut with anything that requires walking to do it.
 
   / trail clearing technique and tools
  • Thread Starter
#1,065  
It's been an unusually wet August in Middle Tennessee causing our vegetation to grow to be pretty thick. My experience is a metal blade will cut through thick vegetation faster, but string flails around so much that it chops material into more pieces.

Having seen a rattlesnake in my yard about 1-2 weeks ago, I'm not very motivated to go cut with anything that requires walking to do it.
What size string?
 
   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,066  
It was the large diameter string run in a walk behind Craftsman push trimmer. It tore kudzu up better than anything I've used, but the machine was a pain to push and the string kept breaking. So I went back to metal because I can be cutting instead of changing string all the time.
 
   / trail clearing technique and tools
  • Thread Starter
#1,067  
On the NCT over the weekend. Top photo is a tree that fell along the trail (not across) earlier this summer. Wally is on the trail and it ascends this hill. Last photo is its gone.
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   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,068  
   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,069  
From:
STIHL Trimmer Heads and Line

"Actually, STIHL premium line will absorb 5% of its own weight in water. Trimmer line does tend to dry out over time and becomes more brittle. Storing it or soaking it in water will help reduce line breakage and make the line more flexible."

Bruce
 
   / trail clearing technique and tools #1,070  
Also tested a new steel cutting blade for small tress reputed to "can cut thousands acres of trees with". When we cut small trees, there are hundreds of them. That means when you cut one, it falls over and keeps you from seeing others. Keep cutting along as best you can and visibility goes further down and trees you think we cut, are actually 90% off and can't be removed.

Conclusion. Limited use when have a thick growth of trees to remove. Limited usability at best.View attachment 817143View attachment 817144
I use a 9" version of that with carbide chain saw teeth to cut sweet gum saplings out if my pines. It does larger vines and other stuff too. Have to take a smaller swath for sure. I tried an 8" one once and it didn't work nearly as well. Have you tried the one that looks like a 3-blade edger blade?
 
 
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