Tie Down Capacity

   / Tie Down Capacity #11  
From the FMCSA website if you can understand it. "Minimum Working Load Limit for Cargo Securement Devices and Systems
The aggregate working load limit of any securement system used to secure an article or group of articles against movement must be at least one-half the weight of the article or group of articles. The aggregate working load limit is the sum of: One-half the working load limit of each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle to an attachment point on an article of cargo; and The working load limit for each tiedown that goes from an anchor point on the vehicle, through, over or around the cargo and then attaches to another anchor point on the vehicle."

I have said this over and over again, go to the site and read the "Educational Materials Cover Cargo Securment". The material will help you understand Subparts 393.100 through 393.136.

Anyone who has ever hauled rolls of paper in a box trailer should get a kick out of the ongoing chains vs straps comments. True, each have pluses and minuses and should be used accordingly with some cross over of applicability. There are some specifics in the regs such as for containers (latching devices or chains) and chains only for boulders and no straps for crushed cars. For most applications, the keyword is tiedowns.

For most occasional users on this forum, chains would probably be better if for no other reason than they would never wear out and would satisfy the average DOT cops scrutinizing.

Chains weigh alot more than straps do. All those little lbs add up. Straps are less likely to damage cargo, alot of which is like tying down eggshells yet must stay on a trailer. The load that you see strapped down rather than chained may be due to the backhaul that was available and not the normal load. If the main cargo is heavy equipment, straps would hardly be economically feasible.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #12  
... Anyone who has ever hauled rolls of paper in a box trailer should get a kick out of the ongoing chains vs straps comments...

Do you mean rolls of paper as in the types of rolls that go into cash registers and gas pumps or the type that are used to print newspapers? (quite a difference in how they are packaged)

The large rolls of paper used in newspapers are hauled standing on end and fit fairly packed into the box trailer. They are loaded and unloaded with a clamp-truck type of fork-lift, therefore can be packed in better than a load that is hand-loaded.

There is no real comparison to loading, securing and hauling this type of load and transporting a tractor on an open flatbed.

The thing to remember, we are securing the load for the load to be secure. We are not trying to see how cheaply we can do it. We are not trying to see how fast we can do it. We are not trying to see how much weight we can save on the overall load.

We ARE trying to make sure the tractor stays on the trailer. So, whatever method you use, make sure it is tight and will stay put on your trailer. Make sure it is secure and will stay that way.

Now, if you want another "fun" discussion, start one about using "lever" type chain-binders as opposed to "ratchet-style" binders :thumbsup:
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #13  
Do you mean rolls of paper as in the types of rolls that go into cash registers and gas pumps or the type that are used to print newspapers? (quite a difference in how they are packaged)

The large rolls of paper used in newspapers are hauled standing on end and fit fairly packed into the box trailer. They are loaded and unloaded with a clamp-truck type of fork-lift, therefore can be packed in better than a load that is hand-loaded.

There is no real comparison to loading, securing and hauling this type of load and transporting a tractor on an open flatbed.

or rolls of paper from papermill on way to flooring mill, or from same plant rolls of gasket paper or rolls of brake shoes. those rolls are huge and goes into a box trailer, no tie downs. just wedged in place. lol

Its funny I think about the straps vs chains. We tractor owners seem to like oveerkill (myself included :D). I think the large truck drivers have more common sense along with trucking buddies to point them a better way of doing things.

It all boils down to common sense. many people cant seem to size things up with the eye and go with it. With newbies, its always about procedure how its tied down.

to answer kenny's question- as per DOT -its not a matter of % of capacity for said load. Its what if one strap or chains becomes loose, the other straps/chains MUST take over the added on unsecured load in an accident. keyword here is loosened strap/chains in accident.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #14  
Well, what about ratchet type vz lever style chain binders??? I just bought a couple more lever style. Occassionally I do add bailing twine around the levers after they are set to make sure they don't pop open, although this has never happened. The chinese crap lever ones are about $18 vs the USA ratchet ones that I have are about $30.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #15  
Do you mean rolls of paper as in the types of rolls that go into cash registers and gas pumps or the type that are used to print newspapers? (quite a difference in how they are packaged)

The large rolls of paper used in newspapers are hauled standing on end and fit fairly packed into the box trailer. They are loaded and unloaded with a clamp-truck type of fork-lift, therefore can be packed in better than a load that is hand-loaded.

There is no real comparison to loading, securing and hauling this type of load and transporting a tractor on an open flatbed.

The thing to remember, we are securing the load for the load to be secure. We are not trying to see how cheaply we can do it. We are not trying to see how fast we can do it. We are not trying to see how much weight we can save on the overall load.

We ARE trying to make sure the tractor stays on the trailer. So, whatever method you use, make sure it is tight and will stay put on your trailer. Make sure it is secure and will stay that way.

Now, if you want another "fun" discussion, start one about using "lever" type chain-binders as opposed to "ratchet-style" binders :thumbsup:
I am talking about the big rolls standing on end with a friction strip underneath them. The ones that should something go south that will blow through a wall or roof and go wherever. As opposed to something secured on a flatbed that will generally ride out the storm. Yet the rolls are legal to go down the road like that. Heck, people would be amazed to see what goes down the road within those trailer walls with just a couple of pieces of dunnage nailed to the floor and a two inch strap or two hooked to the E channel.

I understand what you are saying about proper securing. My point is that there is always misinformation spread about the legality of straps. The focus should be more on when a strap is ready for the garbage can and how to use them to prevent chafing along with how many should be used and placed correctly.

FWIW, I drove some 12 years then went back to school and had a 20 year stint in electronics then went back to driving for another 5 years. I am back off the road again but I did enough to know how to keep things safe. I pulled ceder fencing out of Canada for three years (double stacked four by four by however long bundles), ~60 foot beams out of Bethlehem Steel, coils out of Sparrows Point, all kinds of building materials, heavy equipment, along with box and dump work. Nothing left along the road and no one hurt though I did have some minors admittingly.

Another recent thread spoke of tie down points, Get this:

"Unrated and Unmarked Anchor Points
FMCSA痴 cargo securement rules do not require rating and
marking of anchor points. While the agency encourages
manufacturers to rate and mark anchor points, the new
rules do not include a requirement for ratings and
markings."

So, you can use grade 70 chain but your anchor points don't necessarily have to be rated the same?

Oh' by the way, I like lever type binders, guess I must be an idiot, lol!
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #16  
We use chain on most equipment, but we use straps on palleted items such as bagged mulch, and air conditioning units, and also on our antique John Deere B & MT. When we haul the two Deeres together, we cross the tricycle front ends, and put a stap pulling from the front of each tractor as well as the back of each tractor, and a shared one across the center of each frame.

No problems, except for once when we were picking the MT up and we were in Ohio, and were stopped and loosely asked to just go to the next stop and add some chains to it. He didn't follow up, but we still just put chains over the straps where they would have made contact with the fairly fresh restored paint.


Kyle
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #17  
I am talking about the big rolls standing on end with a friction strip underneath them. The ones that should something go south that will blow through a wall or roof and go wherever. As opposed to something secured on a flatbed that will generally ride out the storm. Yet the rolls are legal to go down the road like that. Heck, people would be amazed to see what goes down the road within those trailer walls with just a couple of pieces of dunnage nailed to the floor and a two inch strap or two hooked to the E channel.

I know just what you are talking about. My wife unloads those large rolls of paper everyday. I have seen what goes on inside many box trucks. Carpet is not secured at all. It is left to let gravity and friction hold it still inside the box.

If you have a "roll-on/off" dumpster type trailer and "dumpster", it is legal to carry your skid-steer inside the dumpster not tied to anything while the dumpster is tied with straps. If you carry that same skid-steer on a flatbed, it must be tied down.

My binders are also lever type. I usually wrap the excess chain around the handle to insure they cannot open ... though I have never had a properly closed binder open.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #18  
My binders are also lever type. I usually wrap the excess chain around the handle to insure they cannot open ... though I have never had a properly closed binder open.

I do the same thing, and then snap on a padlock to hold it there. Good chain, hooks and loadbinders aren't cheap to replace and of course if they go missing while you're parked at a resaurant while travellinmg the highway, they become priceless.
 
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