Tie Down Capacity

   / Tie Down Capacity #1  

KennyG

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2011
Messages
4,323
Location
SW Michigan
Tractor
John Deere 2320
Does anyone have a guideline for required capacity of tie down straps? I know straps have a working capacity and also have a ultimate strength to provide a factor of safety, but how does the weight of the load correspond to the hold down capacity. For example, if you have a 2000 lb load on a trailer, should the working capacity of the tie downs be 2000 lb or should it be more to account for inertia of the load?
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #2  
In general working capacity should be equal to or greater than weight of load. I would not use straps for anything with wheels except maybe four wheeler use chains Instead.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity
  • Thread Starter
#3  
I've noticed a lot of people are negative on straps and insist on chains, but if you are within the load limits, why? If you have a CUT weighing 1500 to 2500 lbs, held down with 4 straps rated at 1500 or 2000 lbs each, what do you gain with chains?
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #4  
I've noticed a lot of people are negative on straps and insist on chains, but if you are within the load limits, why? If you have a CUT weighing 1500 to 2500 lbs, held down with 4 straps rated at 1500 or 2000 lbs each, what do you gain with chains?

Look up the usdot, fmcsa website and read the rules.

I think you can only use about 1/2 the load of a tie down so you have a large safety factor.

Straps seem to break easier than chains in a shock load like a tired machine.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #5  
In my case, I had to buy something - either straps or chains. I figurerd I might as well get chains as the cost differential is minor and they are the stronger, more durable alternative. But then my tractor is significantly heavier than what you said yours was.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #6  
I always wonder about the straps verses chain theory too. I see semis every day with big loads tied down with straps only. If I tie my tractor down with four straps, with one at each corner I just can't see how it is not safe. As far as being on wheels I put my FEL bucket down on the trailer and also whatever implement I have on I also sit completely down on the trailer.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #7  
I once had an item strapped on a small trailer...nothing too heavy, and I stopped several times to snug them up. I could have used chains, but thought the chain may damage the item.

Arrived at the destination, and I'll be darned one of the straps had a small cut in the edge. I did not think the edge it was on would cut, but it did. I only use straps for holding things like lumber, or furniture or items where chains would damage it, otherwise it's chains. When I do use straps, it's done in over-kill.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #8  
Good timing on this thread. This afternoon I bought some new straps to tie down my JD 2305 and tiller. I had four 3000 pound straps that were 2 years old and showing some wear where the binder wraps around. So I replaced them with four 10,000 pound straps. I use some short chain pieces and hooks so that the strap never touches anything.

I am in the public a lot with it and I got tired of people asking me about the strength of the straps. I guess I should have done this years ago because if the D.O.T. ever stopped me I would be at his mercy. But even my 3000 pound straps are better than none that I see some people use around town.
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #9  
I see semis every day with big loads tied down with straps only.
When's the last time you saw a semi with an excavator, backhoe, dozer, tractor etc... tied down with straps?
 
   / Tie Down Capacity #10  
I use straps to tie down the loads of cardboard I haul (2000 - 3000 lbs a load) and it works fine.

However, I use chain for the tractor. Not only do I not have to worry about something cutting the strap, I don't have to worry that FDOT will give me a ticket. (Seems here in Florida they want you to use chain)

A friend of mine had his forklift tied with chain and straps. An officer saw his trailer and came and inspected. He was told that it was a good thing he had chains, since at first look the officer had only seen the straps. He was ready to issue a ticket until he saw the chains.

The other day I was stopped at a light and a semi pulled up next to me with a load of culverts - big metal ones.

He had blocks on them so they could not roll sideways. He had several straps on the load. He also had a chain/binder near the front, back and middle.

I have seen many rigs hauling heavy equipment and they always have chains - even if they also have straps.
 
 
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