Parking etiquette

   / Parking etiquette #21  
I'd give the on-site management a chance to address the issue with the guy. If that doesn't solve it, call a tow truck. If you've discussed it with him six times already, he clearly doesn't respect your space or you. Once he's had to pay to get his vehicle back, I'm willing to be he'll never do it again.
 
   / Parking etiquette
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#22  
I'd give the on-site management a chance to address the issue with the guy. If that doesn't solve it, call a tow truck. If you've discussed it with him six times already, he clearly doesn't respect your space or you. Once he's had to pay to get his vehicle back, I'm willing to be he'll never do it again.

Trust me ..others have suggested towing it away..around here, if you call for a tow truck.. they expect you to pay for the tow at the time they pick it up.
 
   / Parking etiquette #23  
I guess I’d have to resort to the concrete block suggestion and then charge him to move them again. IMG_1053.JPG
 
   / Parking etiquette #24  
That's an impressive weight way out on that 310.
 
   / Parking etiquette #25  
That's an impressive weight way out on that 310.

Yea, I was sorta impressed. That was more than I’d want to routinely handle but it passed the lift test. And the machine was angled down hill.
 
   / Parking etiquette #26  
No squishy front tires? I guess you have a big HOE out back.

I remember my Dad once said how much he liked JD tractors on account of their longer WB.
 
   / Parking etiquette #27  
No squishy front tires? I guess you have a big HOE out back.

I remember my Dad once said how much he liked JD tractors on account of their longer WB.

The left side is low in air and not far from rolling off the rim. That’s why I cropped it out of the picture. The right side tire was taking it pretty good. The combined weight of the machine and that load is about 24,000 with the front axel taking a lot of it so the front tires are taking it pretty good. And this machine has a massive front axel. I also noticed when I welded the teeth on the bucket that the left side of the cutting edge is wore about 1/2” more so that tire has apparently been low a long time.
 
   / Parking etiquette #28  
The left side is low in air and not far from rolling off the rim. That’s why I cropped it out of the picture. The right side tire was taking it pretty good. The combined weight of the machine and that load is about 24,000 with the front axel taking a lot of it so the front tires are taking it pretty good. And this machine has a massive front axel. I also noticed when I welded the teeth on the bucket that the left side of the cutting edge is wore about 1/2” more so that tire has apparently been low a long time.
Hmm, with the pivot in the front axle, shouldn't it stay level (unless it was low enough to max out the pivot travel)?
Now, if one of the BACK tires were almost flat...

Aaron Z
 
   / Parking etiquette #29  
MA has laws on the books about "private tows".
Look those up on Mass.gov and/or talk to the local precinct covering you, and ask the cops how to do it properly.

You *should* be able to have it towed at owner's expense, and nothing out of pocket to you. Signage will likely be required for the space you are protecting, and that might just be a good start anyway... large sign and clearly defined left-to-right markings of some sort, either on the ground or building. Being a condo, maybe you use double-sided tape to affix to the building at your left edge and right edge, with arrows pointing between them, or some other creative but CLEAR markings?
 
   / Parking etiquette #30  
I'm guessing, whether it's in a Fire Route, or just in someone elses spot might make a difference.
 
 
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