Estimate the Weight of this log

   / Estimate the Weight of this log #21  
Frustum of a Cone.gif
60.7 ft^3 *62.4 * .98 = 3715
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #23  
I need a better ballast especially for use with the grapple. I want a compact but heavy ballast. I have a pretty cool idea for a ballast but I found the stuff to make it but IDK if the place will sell it to me. I may end up making a concrete ballast.

You can get scrap steel "drops" from a manufacturing / welding shop -- cheap. Use that as filler inside the cement to up the weight. If you can get old tire weights those are even better.
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #24  
You can get scrap steel "drops" from a manufacturing / welding shop -- cheap. Use that as filler inside the cement to up the weight. If you can get old tire weights those are even better.

Best be saving up them wheel weights to make cast bullets. The last lead smelter has been shut down by the EPA in December. Now all lead will have to come from overseas.
Bullet castors will be willing to pay real money for wheel weights.
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #25  
Judging by the tractor that log is a good bit lighter than you think.
larry
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #27  
Best be saving up them wheel weights to make cast bullets. The last lead smelter has been shut down by the EPA in December. Now all lead will have to come from overseas.
Bullet castors will be willing to pay real money for wheel weights.

Exactly right.
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #28  
That is one nice looking piece of Oak!
It will stink (not terribly bad) a little bit while you are burning it, but you will get used to it. Did you get about 1.25 cords out of it?
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #29  
Thanks for all the replies. I also used the Woodweb calculator. I was curious to see what you guys came up with. Yes I did lift it with the tractor. I may have been able to lift a little more. With grapple weighing around 450lb, the SSQA on the loader @ 100lb, and the log at 3625 I was lifting 4175lbs.












I think you overestimated the size.
The calculator is for a uniformly tapered log and I think without bark.
After you get past the few lower feet of "butt swell" what was the diameter? 22"?
 
   / Estimate the Weight of this log #30  
I think the weight guesses are high too.

I didnt use a "wood calc" but the volume of a truncated cone is as follows:

[(pi x H)/12] x (R^2 + Rb + b^2)

where H is height (or length in this case)
R is big diameter
b is small base diameter

So...[(3.14 x 29')/12] x (2'^2 + 2*1 + 1^2)
......[91/12] x (4+2+1)
......[7.59] x (7)
= 53.13 cubic feet of wood

From what I could find, green pin oak is 63# per cubic foot

So thats 3221#

BUT WAIT, water is 62.xx pounds per cubic foot. I am betting that wood aint 63#. I certainly dont think that log would sink??

Dry pin oak is 44# /cu ft.

I am betting it is somewhere in between. Maybe 55# for a log weight of about 2900#

Still a nice lift though. But I certainly dont think it is anywhere near the 3625# estimates. That would put it weighing about 6# per cubic foot heavier than water.

An easy way to test: chuck a piece in water and see if it sinks?
 
Last edited:
 
Top