3 phase converter ok ?

   / 3 phase converter ok ? #31  
That Ronk phase converter is definitely expensive compared to some others, but if that is what the printer company wants you will probably have to use it. It certainly appears to be a quality system. There are other less expensive setups that would probably work, but those could lead to warranty problems with the printer.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #32  
Ronk was at one time the big name in phase converters.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #33  
I suggest that if any RPC is recommended the printer likely has a degree of 'power conditioning' built in. (& that's a good thing)

If you build an RPC (w/cheap 3PH motor from CL or EB) I strongly recommend PhaseCraft for the control panel. Their setup help and service after sale are among the best out there. Lots to read here at the bottom of the page. (Not just pitch)

(20 hp, not 2hp) 2� HP Manual Start Rotary Phase Converter Control Panel | eBay

Some general tidbits about phase conversion:
- Phase Perfect doesn't require an idler but it isn't exactly silent. (not too bad, tho')
- an RPC's idler/motor typically runs 'louder' than if used as a load motor with 3PH from the pole.
- At 20hp rating, consider building a 'doghouse' for an RPC (often outside the shop/office) as noise may drown out that of what's running on it. (not so good)

btw. Counting on seeing pics of the printer/output someday. :) (3-D printer, no?)
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ?
  • Thread Starter
#34  
I suggest that if any RPC is recommended the printer likely has a degree of 'power conditioning' built in. (& that's a good thing)

If you build an RPC (w/cheap 3PH motor from CL or EB) I strongly recommend PhaseCraft for the control panel. Their setup help and service after sale are among the best out there. Lots to read here at the bottom of the page. (Not just pitch)

(20 hp, not 2hp) 2� HP Manual Start Rotary Phase Converter Control Panel | eBay

Some general tidbits about phase conversion:
- Phase Perfect doesn't require an idler but it isn't exactly silent. (not too bad, tho')
- an RPC's idler/motor typically runs 'louder' than if used as a load motor with 3PH from the pole.
- At 20hp rating, consider building a 'doghouse' for an RPC (often outside the shop/office) as noise may drown out that of what's running on it. (not so good)

btw. Counting on seeing pics of the printer/output someday. :) (3-D printer, no?)

No, not a 3D. It's a UV printer, for printing on both roll and rigid media.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #35  
I'm not particularly knowledgable about electricity. Here is what I have and looking to do. I have a 200 amp service now and I'm looking at a piece of equipment that requires 3phase. Running 3 to my home would be very ..very expensive, likely 50k +\-. One of the electricians I spoke with said a phase converter may be the answer. He said I needed the motor size and electric requirements to order the correct size converter. My question is weather there are potential drawbacks to using a converter ? ..Any electricians on TBN ?

You can actually do this with a spare 3ph motor. A friend of mine ran a small machine shop out of his home garage that way for years. You do have to give the converter motor a spin sometimes to start it.
You wire 220 to the motor, which is actually two phase, then wire the 3ph rotor or stator windings to the 3ph motor in your machine. I forgot exactly how it's wired off the top of my head but it's simple and you should be able to find it online.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #36  
You can actually do this with a spare 3ph motor. A friend of mine ran a small machine shop out of his home garage that way for years. You do have to give the converter motor a spin sometimes to start it.
You wire 220 to the motor, which is actually two phase, then wire the 3ph rotor or stator windings to the 3ph motor in your machine. I forgot exactly how it's wired off the top of my head but it's simple and you should be able to find it online.

Thats what a rotary phase convertor does.

A 3PH motor WILL run on just two legs of 240v power. But the problem is the legs are 180 degrees apart, so you have a locked rotor as it dont know which way to run. Thus you need to give it a jump start. Many ways to do that, some use a rope wrapped around the shaft and give it a pull, then turn power on, others use a 110v pony motor on a slide with a belt, etc.

Another way to start them is with capacitors. Which is basically what a static convertor is.

The Problem is, since you are only supplying two legs out of 3, you are only making 2/3 the power. So if your goal is to run a 10 HP load, you need a 15HP spare/idler motor to do that......or just understand that your 10HP motor can only make 6.6 HP.

The other issue becomes voltage balance. You will have two legs of 240v, but the third leg that gets generated will be less. Maybe like 200v. Voltage can be balanced out to some extent with some run capacitors, but neither of these are usually an issue with a factory-made RPC.

Because if you purchase a factory made convertor, they take these things into account already. If they are selling a 10HP convertor, they have already upsized the pony motor to ~15HP. But instead of calling it a 15HP convertor as the pony motor is sized, they label it as what size motor you can run off of it.

And another trick they do to better balance the voltage is to increase teh number of windings on that 3rd (generated) leg by 10-15% so the voltage you generate is closer to the two supplied legs.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #37  
Thats what a rotary phase convertor does.

A 3PH motor WILL run on just two legs of 240v power. But the problem is the legs are 180 degrees apart, so you have a locked rotor as it dont know which way to run. Thus you need to give it a jump start. Many ways to do that, some use a rope wrapped around the shaft and give it a pull, then turn power on, others use a 110v pony motor on a slide with a belt, etc.

Another way to start them is with capacitors. Which is basically what a static convertor is.

The Problem is, since you are only supplying two legs out of 3, you are only making 2/3 the power. So if your goal is to run a 10 HP load, you need a 15HP spare/idler motor to do that......or just understand that your 10HP motor can only make 6.6 HP.

The other issue becomes voltage balance. You will have two legs of 240v, but the third leg that gets generated will be less. Maybe like 200v. Voltage can be balanced out to some extent with some run capacitors, but neither of these are usually an issue with a factory-made RPC.

Because if you purchase a factory made convertor, they take these things into account already. If they are selling a 10HP convertor, they have already upsized the pony motor to ~15HP. But instead of calling it a 15HP convertor as the pony motor is sized, they label it as what size motor you can run off of it.

And another trick they do to better balance the voltage is to increase teh number of windings on that 3rd (generated) leg by 10-15% so the voltage you generate is closer to the two supplied legs.


Figured as much. Hopefully someday they will start wiring everything with 3Ph. It's more efficient and they keep talking about saving energy so much. Motors are cheaper and you don't need the start run capacitors and junk. There's 3 on the pole already so they just need to start installing 3ph transformers and service wiring instead of playing the balancing game they do.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #38  
Three phase doesn't really make much sense in a residence. Need a lot of motor loads to gain any benefit.

It's probably easier for the power company to balance than hope residences are balanced.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #39  
Three phase doesn't really make much sense in a residence. Need a lot of motor loads top gain any benefit.

It's probably easier for the power company to balance than hope residences are balanced.

Well add em up. Two AC units, two well pumps, a table saw, drill press, air compressor and that's just the larger home motors. Add in the fridge and freezer and smaller stuff and it would save some bucks running all that stuff over the long run. Back in the day AC wasn't so common and about all they worried about were lights really. Now the lighting loads have dropped off while the motor loads have started to mount up.
 
   / 3 phase converter ok ? #40  
Well add em up. Two AC units, two well pumps, a table saw, drill press, air compressor and that's just the larger home motors. Add in the fridge and freezer and smaller stuff and it would save some bucks running all that stuff over the long run. Back in the day AC wasn't so common and about all they worried about were lights really. Now the lighting loads have dropped off while the motor loads have started to mount up.
I think it has a lot more to do with economics. As long as the power companies can charge outrageous rates for three phase they will charge them.
 
 
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