Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing

   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #51  
Maybe some sort of harmonic between truck and trailer and road bed?

Yes, every truck and trailer combo can be different. What exactly are the specs on the truck and the trailer? Where is the ball mounted in the bed of the truck, the exact placement in relation to the rear axle?
 
   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #52  
I will need to get the exact for the trailer purchased…

There were several viewed from different dealers and the one I was up to speed on was sold the morning we went to pick it up… it had a tilt back.

The trailer purchased was not a tilt back…

Without the farm it would need a CDL… my PJ was bought de-rated so no CDL needed.

The truck has the factory GN prep package.
 

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   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #53  
quick question for you. When you bought that 3500, did the dealer let you know that pretty much any 10k+ trailer you hooked up to would require a CDL to go down the road? I was wondering if they are warning new buyers about that?
My salesman and the GM both discussed it. They know me well enough to know I am up on the laws and had taken it into consideration. Texas Class C license allows you to pull a 20,000 lbs. trailer with farm tags. Both the 14GN deck over and the 14GX dump trailer have farm tags. Both are a gross weight of 15,900 lbs. with a carrying capacity of 11,000 lbs. each. My Sundowner horse trailer has farm tags but has a gross weight of 9990 lbs., so it is no concern.

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   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #54  
Not to rehash CDL laws in yet another thread.....because it always turns lengthy and many people have different opinions.....BUT....

1st....the truck itself does not require a CDL. So there is no obligation for any dealer to even mention that. ANd honestly surprised they did because it could jeopardize a sale.

2nd.....the "C" in cdl stands for commercial. IE engaging in commerce. Dont apply if you are hauling around your own crap and not for hire.
 
   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #55  
Problem is what happens when your rig or trailer is impounded?

At one time was involved with endurance rides and friends with a 4 horse trailer and small cabin in front ran into all kinds of problems missing the entire event and had to call someone with a CDL and truck to help.
 
   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #56  
Not to rehash CDL laws in yet another thread.....because it always turns lengthy and many people have different opinions.....BUT....

1st....the truck itself does not require a CDL. So there is no obligation for any dealer to even mention that. ANd honestly surprised they did because it could jeopardize a sale.

2nd.....the "C" in cdl stands for commercial. IE engaging in commerce. Dont apply if you are hauling around your own crap and not for hire.
Again not to rehash, your 2nd point isn’t true, makes no difference. Hauling stuff with a GCWR over 26k regardless of commerce. Many states do have the farmer exclusion.

But I think dealers owe it to new buyers to let them know that since the GVWR of these newer trucks are so high that pretty much any 10k+ trailer requires a CDL. Glad this dealer is discussing it so it is not a surprise.
 
   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #58  
Each state does licensing different (although there may be some Federal commercial limits).

Here in Oregon, there is a cutoff at 8,000 lbs GVWR (trailer). Above 8K, they want you to get "T" plates on the tow vehicle. I don't believe that is a commercial designation, but rather taxes.

The DMV doesn't seem to get too picky about trailers up to about 10K being licensed at 8K, but I wouldn't do a 16K or 20K equipment trailer.

A Gooseneck or 5th wheel doesn't matter.

I think there is also a limit that the trailer isn't supposed to be longer than about 35 feet without a CDL.

They also want you to have a CDL if you have air brakes.

Then, I think your combination pickup or truck + trailer must be below 26,000 lbs, otherwise you'll need a CDL.

Look up the local laws. It does give some flexibility. However, if you get a 16K trailer, the trailer itself will be massively heavy, and will reduce your cargo weight somewhat. And, for the 16K trailer, you may need to keep your tow vehicle under 10K.

It seems rare that personal vehicles are forced to get weighed (or fuel dipped). But, if you have a load that looks clearly overweight, they may take some interest in you. Or, of course, if you get in an accident they may take a keen interest in compliance with laws.
 
   / Replacement Trailer Type & Sizing #60  
You are the first person I’ve heard say that a gooseneck towed rougher than a bumper pull. My experience is both a better ride and handling with any gooseneck I have owned or used. My gooseneck stock trailer tows so nice that I have to be careful and keep reminding myself that I’m towing a trailer. But the stock trailer is heavier than a flatbed, so that probably makes the difference. No trailer tows smoothly when empty.
Not necessarily true. My 32-foot PJ gooseneck rides great, whether empty or at a full 25K. Of course, I did order it with air suspension.

Also not true is that 26K requires a CDL. I'm perfectly legal up to 39,000 lbs. (14K plus 25K) in this state.

Anyway, I would try balancing those trailer tires and see if the ride improves. There's no reason for a trailer not to ride smoothly if the road surface is decent.
 
 
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