Best Chainsaw Sharpner?

   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #21  
I asked this question to a professional logger and his reply: "Real loggers use a file and unskilled logger wannabes use an electric sharpener". I don't know if he was serious or joking?

Well, as a hack chainsaw dude (not unlike me being a hack at everything else), alls I could say is that I could sharpen my 2 chains with the electric gadget thingie from Harbor Fright in way less time/effort than it takes me to sharpen 1 chain with a manual file, sooooo.... And, it does a way better job of it.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #22  
"best" depends on the user. It takes some practice to be able to hand file well. Some people are better at keeping a consistent angle and filing the underside of the tooth than others.

I learned to hand file when I was running saws all day every day for work. The feedback loop from filing to using was short, so I learned fast. I had it down in a week or so. Someone running a saw a few hours each weekend would take a long time to have that same experience. I've tried the Granberg type guide and found it cumbersome and slow.

A couple years back I was running my saws every afternoon doing brush clearing. I splurged and bought a nice electric grinder. I use it on chains that got rocked or hit a nail in a tree, and to true up the angles and tooth lengths after many hand filings.

I don't take much off the teeth when I'm filing or grinding. Just enough to make a sharp edge and get back to clean chrome on the tops of the teeth. The rakers rarely need to be taken down.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #23  
"best" depends on the user. It takes some practice to be able to hand file well. Some people are better at keeping a consistent angle and filing the underside of the tooth than others. I learned to hand file when I was running saws all day every day for work. The feedback loop from filing to using was short, so I learned fast. I had it down in a week or so. Someone running a saw a few hours each weekend would take a long time to have that same experience. I've tried the Granberg type guide and found it cumbersome and slow. A couple years back I was running my saws every afternoon doing brush clearing. I splurged and bought a nice electric grinder. I use it on chains that got rocked or hit a nail in a tree, and to true up the angles and tooth lengths after many hand filings. I don't take much off the teeth when I'm filing or grinding. Just enough to make a sharp edge and get back to clean chrome on the tops of the teeth. The rakers rarely need to be taken down.

I agree with Eric and do trail clearing. By that, we work in the dirt and dull chains rather quickly. We simply hand file chains for a quick resharpening and can do that many times, before the rakes need to be knocked down. After a while, the chains need to be machine sharpened and angles corrected.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #24  
I asked this question to a professional logger and his reply: "Real loggers use a file and unskilled logger wannabes use an electric sharpener". I don't know if he was serious or joking?
probably serious. but heck with it. i use my oregon electric sharpener. does an awesome job. chains are like new. fast job of sharpening to boot. as a plus, by removing the chain a have a chance to blow out saw with air nozzle.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #26  
I find I get on best with a good quality diamond file. The art is, to let the file do the work without too much pressure.
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #27  
I hand file if no other option is available but in most cases start my trip to the woods with a sharp chain on the saw and another sharp chain in a bucket.
When chips turn to dust I will swap chains in the field and continue to work. At the end of the day or on a bad weather day I will tune up the chains with my Oregon Grinder and service the saw as necessary in preparation for another days work.

B. John
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #28  
I've tried HF sharpener, too much play in them to work well. I've used the hand held electric ones, not bad if you are careful. I just prefer to hand file, chains last longer and stay sharper.

My biggest use of chains were in 1996, hurricane Fran, I had 40+ trees down and under muddy water. I spent the first few weeks helping other neighbors with trees. Got some rain to wash most of the mud away. Even when the trees looked clean, at dusk, it was a chainsaw sparks show... I would dull 4 or 5 chains per day and spent the night sharpening them... nothing else to do without power... Had a 44" diameter oak that cut into 6" disks (that was as much wood as I could roll up the hill to the street) about 12 feet (gone to waste).

Ended up throwing 6 of the 8 chains that I had... the last two were pretty worn too...
 
   / Best Chainsaw Sharpner? #29  
D9BF89B5-70F3-4330-A384-C4E8DC952882.jpegMine's made by Oregon, I buy a box of 9 for about 15 bucks. Yet all of the other methods mentioned above work for the user, otherwise they wouldn't be posting about it. For best results put it in a vise and use a file guide when it starts to get out of whack. I usually run the file across the teeth about every other tank of gas though, and take the rakers down about every 5th sharpening.
This is what I use for a file guide. I have one for each chain size.
 
 
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