Aluminum decking

   / Aluminum decking #31  
I'll have to price the difference in materials & time between using plywood (expensive but quick) and blocking (cheaper but more work).

Installing the bridging between the joists (option A) would be much easier if you use joist hangers. The cut lengths of the bridging don't have to be that accurate and shorter screws can be used. They add a little to the cost but save a lot of time & effort.
 
   / Aluminum decking #32  
Since you have it torn apart to the joists anyways, what about removing them and rebuilding to reorient them to what the top portion of the picture shows (neither A or B)? Would it take more time and effort than blocking or laying plywood? It would certainly cost less and allow for replacement of bad pieces that can't be re-used. It would not add any weight and allow the underside of the decking to breathe and be visible for inspection
I'd prefer having the joists running that way, but the deck already exists and needs a new surface (assuming a majority of the current joists are in decent enough condition to use!).
When I installed my DryLoc deck, I removed the old joists, which were in good condition, and reinstalled them parallel to the house. Some additional lumber was needed but there was a significant cost savings. The deck is 14' off the ground and I used scaffold which made the job much easier.
That's what I suggested about, including the scaffolding. He says there's an issue with headers and clearance, but that should be able to be worked out.
I think turning the joists would require supporting headers to be installed lower and I don't think we have the space to do that.
Installing the bridging between the joists (option A) would be much easier if you use joist hangers. The cut lengths of the bridging don't have to be that accurate and shorter screws can be used. They add a little to the cost but save a lot of time & effort.
Like everything else, joist hangars and screws aren't priced the way they used to be. That many might add considerable cost, but less than plywood. Less weight too. But then there is the extra time involved cutting all the blocks.

In the end, I think reorienting the joists would be best. Makes more sense than cobbling things together considering the work and costs involved.
 
 
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