TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm

   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #21  
I would imagine (could be wrong) that there will be enough residual carbon in the steel of the lower liink that heating it to dull red with a gas axe and then straghtening it and then cold water quenching it would restore the temper.
You are not wrong. Heat and quench plus temper would bring most of it back along with the suggestion of welding up splints would be even better than original. It won't be real pretty but that would be the last concern in my book.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #22  
I would imagine (could be wrong) that there will be enough residual carbon in the steel of the lower liink that heating it to dull red with a gas axe and then straghtening it and then cold water quenching it would restore the temper.
Heating to “Dull red 1291 F” is very near the A1 temperature line for carbon steel (1331 - 1340 F). At A1 the carbon enters into the matrix and if quenched results in “hardening” of the steel. BUT, this also makes the steel more brittle which is not a good thing for this part.

Metallurgy Major.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #24  
Heating to “Dull red 1291 F” is very near the A1 temperature line for carbon steel (1331 - 1340 F). At A1 the carbon enters into the matrix and if quenched results in “hardening” of the steel. BUT, this also makes the steel more brittle which is not a good thing for this part.

Metallurgy Major.
Heating and allow it to slowly cool would bring the toughness back and make it less brittle after water or oil quench. Welding on a 3/8" steel plate as a splint cam also help to the final product.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #25  
Heating and allow it to slowly cool would bring the toughness back and make it less brittle after water or oil quench. Welding on a 3/8" steel plate as a splint cam also help to the final product.
True, but the annealing process is MUCH harder than hardening. The cooling process is time critical and varies with the thickness and carbon content of the metal. Even the “starting” temperature of the steel varies with the type of steel. Not many inexperienced can get it right. When I was at Kaiser Steel metallurgy lab, even metallurgist with years of experience would miss it some times.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #26  
True, but the annealing process is MUCH harder than hardening. The cooling process is time critical and varies with the thickness and carbon content of the metal. Even the “starting” temperature of the steel varies with the type of steel. Not many inexperienced can get it right. When I was at Kaiser Steel metallurgy lab, even metallurgist with years of experience would miss it some times.
You are right and not questioning it at all. I am just talking in the area of " good enough for government work". The fact is the bending has happened for whatever reason. One can buy or try to repair. Repair as I suggested is probably better than good enough or you buy a band new one $$$$.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #27  
You are right and not questioning it at all. I am just talking in the area of " good enough for government work". The fact is the bending has happened for whatever reason. One can buy or try to repair. Repair as I suggested is probably better than good enough or you buy a band new one $$$$.
You are right and not questioning it at all. I am just talking in the area of " good enough for government work". The fact is the bending has happened for whatever reason. One can buy or try to repair. Repair as I suggested is p
If it was my repair,I would just straighten it with a press. Cold working steel results in work hardening which makes the metal harder, stiffer, and stronger, but less plastic. But it may cause cracks of the piece if too much “work” is done. The small bend in this item should be OK
0You are right and not questioning it at all. I am just talking in the area of " good enough for government work". The fact is the bending has happened for whatever reason. One can buy or try to repair. Repair as I suggested is probably better than good enough or you buy a band new one $$$$.
You are right and not questioning it at all. I am just talking in the area of " good enough for government work". The fact is the bending has happened for whatever reason. One can buy or try to repair. Repair as I suggested is probably better than good enough or you buy a band new one $$$$.
If it was my repair,I would just straighten it with a press. Cold working steel results in work hardening which makes the metal harder, stiffer, and stronger, but less plastic. But it may cause cracks of the piece if too much “work” is done. The small bend in this item should be OK.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #28  
I've bent draft arms when backing up with the box blade and just kissing a tree with the side of it. Took the arms off and straightened 'em cold with a 20T HFT press which was more than enough. Did this with my old NH 1520 and current T 1520 at least once each, and no further problems.
 
   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm
  • Thread Starter
#29  
The hydraulic press was able to straighten my arms. No heat was used. I repainted them and will re-install once the paint is dry - just in time for the next snowfall forecast for Thursday.

For those who asked how I bent them, I was snow blowing, and hit a buried stump. Amazingly, the snow blower itself is fine. This spring I'll have to get rid of that stump.

I briefly considered reinforcing the arms somehow, but decided not to. If I ever hit something again, it's probably better for these arms to bend, instead of breaking something more expensive.
 

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   / TC33DA - bent 3 point hitch arm #30  
My father had a Ford 3910 that we managed to bend the arms on. He would turn me loose with a10 pound sledge hammer across the concrete drain troughs from the old dairy barn. this was after no luck trying to drive over them. Sledge hammer worked but you better have your steel toes, safety glasses and ear plugs in and on.
 
 
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