Rope for pulling trees over

   / Rope for pulling trees over #21  
I use the winch on my ATV to raise and lower a snow blade. The original steel aircraft cable that came with my Warn winch self destructed in the spool. It frayed and broke after one year of use. I replaced it with Amsteel Blue winch rope. I have been using this Amsteel Blue for 6 years in my winch now with no noticeable signs of wear. Not so expensive now compared to replacing the steel aircraft cable every year for the past six years.

What cable are you replacing every year?

Nevermind... I'm dumb.. :)
 
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   / Rope for pulling trees over #22  
Hmmm... yes expensive, but looks very interesting! Thanks for sharing. The material is UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene). This plastic is very tough and strong and used by the Navy for well decks and ballistic armor to name a few applications. I might have to invest in some of this rope. But it is not cheap! What also is exciting is the light weight aspect. No more having to lug heavy chains and trying to throw them around things.

Another major aspect is safety - if this pops free, there is a lot less kinetic energy released to bystanders. The same cannot be said when a chain or wire rope lets go.

David
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #23  
My sons and I have cut down a lot of trees over the years. I used to sell firewood and then for a long time we heated our house with a fireplace and my wife loves a big fire, so she burned a lot of wood.
I tie a piece of 1/4" nylon rope to a 2lb hammer and throw it over a limb high in the tree. I then use it to pull a 3/4" rope up and over the limb and tie an eye in it to pull a loop tight to the tree.
I then tie the end of the rope to the front of my truck or my favorite tree puller, my wife's Honda Pilot.
I have the wife or son or me, depending on who is helping take the slack out of the rope by backing up.
I cut the notch in the tree in the direction I want it to fall.
I start making my cut from the other side as as soon as the tree starts to move I nod my head up and down, my driver knows this means to back up a little more keeping slack out of the rope and does so, pulling the tree exactly in the direction we want as I finish the cut.
I have also used the tractor, but since it has a clutch, it is not as easy to keep steady tension on the rope.
I have also used left over 5/16" cable I got free from work, but I would rather work with rope.
As someone said above, if I were closer to the beginning of my tree cutting I would look at the blue rope. The problems I have had with rope is keeping them long and not having to tie several together. With three sons growing up with four wheelers and 4wd vehicles my ropes sometimes got shorter, or drug in two or ugly hatchet knots in the middle of them. Now that they are grown I think my ropes will last a long time.
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #24  
[I]Another major aspect is safety - if this pops free, there is a lot less kinetic energy released to bystanders. The same cannot be said when a chain or wire rope lets go.[/I]

I do not agree at all with that statement. A rope or nylon sling under extreme tension is as dangerous as a loaded gun. I never let anyone stand near where the rope could hit them if it did break.

We once got our motor home stuck on the beach in St. Augustine Florida. I had a very heavy duty braided military rope that I had bought at the flea market. It was ~ 1" diameter. A fellow with a big jacked up old Dodge SUV tried to pull me out with my rope. I tied it to the front of my MH and made a loop over his trailer ball. After digging himself in a couple of times he backed up about 10 feet and took off. I knew it was going to be trouble but didn't have time to stop him as I was behind the wheel of the MH.
When he got to the end of the rope it broke just behind my knot. I heard the rope snap, then a loud thwack. I got out and looked and the rope, still attached to my MH had gone through the spokes on two bicycle wheels of the bikes on the front of my MH. It looked like someone had thrown something the size of a football through the bike wheels.
Just after this happened a park ranger stopped and told me he had seen a person get his leg broken by a rope while doing the same thing.
He also gave the guy in the Dodge a lecture about drinking on the beach and being stupid with his truck.
Another guy pulled me out slowly and gently with his truck by getting on the damp sand for more traction. He would not take any money, so I gave him my rope for pulling me out.
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #25  
I think that the operative difference is the obviously significant weight of the : "very heavy braided military rope...~1" thick", which per foot had to vastly outweigh a similar diameter of a newer rope like the Amsteel Blue (or of the several knockoffs/wannabes I have seen) which per diameter is also massively stronger.

I have broken wire rope/cable, tow chains and straps (despite slow non-kinetic pulling), and the straps behaved very differently from the chains and cable, which which whiplashed dangerously. The strap was limp spaghetti immediately without any spring back, despite the amount of stretch/elasticity it displayed.

I just ordered the Amsteel Blue that has been sitting on my EBay watchlist and Amazon wishlist for over a year because the 20' double-eye ended rope they had in their "garage sale" was half the price of a 25' piece at the regular price, and for my plow winch (a HF 3k-rated cheapie) the 4900# working limit of their 3/16" rope is plenty, and rope that thin will also take up less space on my drum.

For comparison, 3/16" galvanized is typically rated at 3700#, and is stiffer and heavier, though much less expensive at approx $15/1000'.

For me it's,more about the failure rate of the metal cable and having to repair or replace it in 3' of snow while trying to clear the driveway- and of course it always breaks at 0200 (AM) at the far end of the 1000' driveway.

Thomas
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #27  
I bought a new nylon 3/4 inch rope reel (150 feet) at Lowes. Using different methods I fish a 1/4" nylon rope as I high as necessary to pull the 3/4 " up into the tree. Most of these are 40-50 ft dead pine trees. Working by myself usually, I tie the main rope to the front hooks of my Super Duty and put some tension in the direction of the fall. Then I do the cut accordingly until it looks like enough. Then I do the rest with the truck. If it is a critical fall, I get my neighbor buddy to do the cutting after I've prepared everything. Don't use questionable rope that is old, rotten or damaged. This has worked for me in about 20 falls, even around power lines and the house.
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #28  
I then tie the end of the rope to the front of my truck or my favorite tree puller, my wife's Honda Pilot.
I have the wife or son or me, depending on who is helping take the slack out of the rope by backing up.
I cut the notch in the tree in the direction I want it to fall.
I start making my cut from the other side as as soon as the tree starts to move I nod my head up and down, my driver knows this means to back up a little more keeping slack out of the rope and does so, pulling the tree exactly in the direction we want as I finish the cut.
.

I had a 70' 12" dia. fairly straight tree about 10' next to my new pole building. The fall should have been easy because the long driveway was right parallel with the building. I tied a 100' cable about 15' up the tree and the other end to the hooks on my dually with tension on the cable. My wife was in the truck, and I told her that when I cut the tree and it starts to tip a little, start pulling down the driveway. Simple enough. The tree would fall parallel with the garage on the driveway. I put a little notch in the front, then I started cutting the rear. As soon as I saw the tree was going to fall, or close to it, I backed up and waved my arms to go. She got confused by that and stayed put. After the tension left the cable the tree fell where it wanted to and barely missed the corner of the shed. I fired her.:D
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #29  
I pound a large spike [ painted orange or with orange marking tape on it ] up above where my ladder reaches to, and use this to help put the chain around the trunk. Then hook a 1/2" steel cable to the chain. I put a big wide nylon strap around the tree base I am falling towards. Then hook the tree strap to the steel cable with two come-alongs and fill the rest with chain. I use the first come along to take up the slack in the setup and get the cable fairly taught. Then walk the setup and make sure everything is still hooked up right along the pull line. Notch the tree in that direction..then put lots more tension on the cable. I make a partial cut thru the trunk, then readd tension to the cable. Wait a few minutes... cut... tension... wait a few... repeat. In the 'wait' periods you will start to hear the trunk as it breaks at the cut point. You can actually stop cutting, and just slowly pull the tree over. As with all things, make a wide path between the trunk and the come alongs, and watch your arse.....
 
   / Rope for pulling trees over #30  
As soon as I saw the tree was going to fall, or close to it, I backed up and waved my arms to go. She got confused by that and stayed put. After the tension left the cable the tree fell where it wanted to and barely missed the corner of the shed. I fired her.:D
Thats a good point, probably good idea to go over your plan and hand signals with your helper.
 
 
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