Rail roads and their tracks.

   / Rail roads and their tracks. #2,801  
If you zoom in on the image, you can see that there is a disc brake rotor on each wheelset. that is why they are being hauled lengthwise instead of crosswise. They are probably for commuter passenger cars, as they use disc brakes instead friction shoe types..
 
   / Rail roads and their tracks. #2,802  
They were going west, probably from the port of Baltimore.
 
   / Rail roads and their tracks. #2,803  
NJ Transit double decker commuters have in board Disks like those.

NJT is so bad at repair on the older outside bake single deckers that I've seen brake shoes fly past the windows more than once.
 
   / Rail roads and their tracks. #2,804  
If you zoom in on the image, you can see that there is a disc brake rotor on each wheelset. that is why they are being hauled lengthwise instead of crosswise. They are probably for commuter passenger cars, as they use disc brakes instead friction shoe types..
Ah, so they's whack into each other and/or not be able to be set on the trailer staggered like I normally see them?
 
   / Rail roads and their tracks.
  • Thread Starter
#2,805  
date is May 11, 2013. Ten years ago today (May 11, 2023)

Duluth and the Lake Superior Railroad Museum are hosts to one of the greatest spectacles in recent rail preservation.

Two live steam locomotives, Milwaukee Road 261 & Soo Line 2719 are seen here during the many festivities that made up what was then Amtrak-sponsored "National Train Day".

MILW 261 had recently arrived from Minneapolis on its first excursion following a 5-year hiatus. SOO 2719, its days of service numbered, was being prepped for a special dinner train made up of LSRM & RHMMA passenger equipment.

As of May 11, 2023, the 261 still steams a few times a year around the Twin Cities. 2719, meanwhile, made her last run on September 14, 2013, and remains on display at the museum in Duluth.

This is the one and only time I've been privileged to photograph two live steam locomotives side by side.

346482856_3429035110686086_5454431530693586855_n.jpg
 
   / Rail roads and their tracks. #2,809  
We were still suppling friction axles for some customers into the early 80's. A lot of times these orders were for overseas customers and or a special built locomotives/ mining and or switchers. There was also Hyatt design straight roller journal bearing/ oil lubricated/ which I think was a precursor to the Timken design. N&S held onto that Hyatt design for there locomotives into the early 90's. At that time the friction motor suspension was superseded to the rolling element/ opposed tapered rolling bearings. Part of the assembly of the rolling element axle required end holes in the axle so that the axle assembly could be picked up and built vertically. On the Hyatt design the end of the axle was the the thrust face for the Hyatt bearing and there could be no holes in the end of the axle for the Hyatt design. Therefore when N&S purchased locomotives that had rolling element motor suspension that included Timken, Brenco style tapered roller bearings. Just some history.
 
 
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