Looking at a forklift

   / Looking at a forklift #1  

Tomtint

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
3,116
Location
Boston
Tractor
L3700SU
So I'm in the market for a used forklift. I know very little about them but from what I have learned, I think I'm leaning towards one with pneumatic tires so it can be used on asphalt as well as concrete. My needs I'll be minimal..probably less than 40 hrs a year of use. And the heaviest lift will be 2800 lbs. I found a 3500 hr propane Hyster 3k unit that appears to be in good condition and well maintained. It's in the 10,500 range. A little more than I want to spend but the cleanest used one I have come across in my area. Anyone have any input or personal experience ....what to look for and what to avoid ?
 
   / Looking at a forklift #2  
That is about what I have heard similar ones selling for in good shape.
If you need to be outside on gravel more than inside and have room inside, I might look at one of the ones that is built with dual wheels in the front like this:
hqdefault.jpeg

Aaron Z
 
   / Looking at a forklift #3  
Sometimes the bigger ones are better deals because the smaller ones are in demand more. Mine is a Hyster H50H of unknown vintage, but it was only $500 from work, saved them from fixing it up and running it through the auction. 5000 lb capacity, had a weak cylinder (in the engine) and the steering box is sloppy to where it wants to groundloop but it works fine for my use.
forklift.jpg
 
   / Looking at a forklift #4  
You might find an older tractor style unit. The kind that looks like a fork lift boom on the back of a tractor with a rear facing seat. The old brick layers contractor style.

You may not need the rough terrain ability, but it may be better outdoors and a cheaper cost unit, more easily maintained with more common tractor parts.
 
   / Looking at a forklift #5  
Tomtint can you tell us what you need one for? There are so many types of forklift it is impossible to recommend one without knowing what you need it for. With that being said sideshift and power adjust forks are a dream if you can find one with them.
 
   / Looking at a forklift #6  
Tomtint can you tell us what you need one for? There are so many types of forklift it is impossible to recommend one without knowing what you need it for. With that being said sideshift and power adjust forks are a dream if you can find one with them.
At very least, make sure it has side shift.


Aaron Z
 
   / Looking at a forklift #7  
I had two Yale units,, and owned them both for over a decade,, propane, 3K and 5K capacity,,

I paid $3,500 each, which I thought was too much at the time, but, I did not have time to hunt,,,
Total repairs was,, one battery, and one master cylinder. Other than that, an annual oil change, and replace the propane tank as necessary,,
I still have one of the propane tanks,,,

I would bet that there are a bunch of trucks that would suit you in Greensboro NC for $5K or less,,
 
   / Looking at a forklift
  • Thread Starter
#8  
Tomtint can you tell us what you need one for? There are so many types of forklift it is impossible to recommend one without knowing what you need it for. With that being said sideshift and power adjust forks are a dream if you can find one with them.

It would be used to move pallets of boxes of window film. Each box weighs about 75lbs and there is typically 20-25 of them on a pallet. Thy get put up into racking like you would see at Home Depot. It will also be used to lift a couple Harley Davidsons up to a second floor for the winters and down again in the spring. The bikes will be on a custom made platform and strapped down. Once it's raised to the2nd floor height, I would have to get on the bike and back it off the platform. Bike weighs about 900lbs, platform weighs about 200 lbs and once I'm on they platform .im 225 lbs. it may also be used to load and unload the salt spreader in and out of the dump truck. The spreader weighs about 1200 pounds empty but picking it up from the back puts a lot of weight far out past the end of the forks.
 
   / Looking at a forklift #9  
Outdoor forklifts with pneumatic tires are more expensive and harder to find than indoor units with cushion tires. If you are driving on asphalt and concrete then the cushion tires will be fine. Im able to occasionally run my cushion tire 5,000 lb indoor forklift outdoors on hardpack gravel as long as I avoid soft or wet spots. Sharp turns and a lead foot will get you stuck quickly.
I also recommend getting a machine with side shift. Pay attention to lift height. An automatic tranny is good to have as well.
If you are lifting heavy stuff up high Id suggest getting a 5,000 lb forklift because it will still be compact enough to drive around in the shop and give you more comfort and less pucker making the high lifts. I too have a storage platform and I store my implements on pallet racks with the highest shelves at 16 feet.
If you have employees buy an older used certified unit from a dealer and save some headaches.
 
   / Looking at a forklift #10  
I ran a forklift in a receiving department for years. Side shift would be high on the must have lift. If you clean and properly lube the fork hangers moving the forks in and out is not bad. Most forklifts get all gunked up and are really tough to move back and forth.

It may be ancient history, but make sure what type of mast lift it has. I think most are progressive hydraulic. But there are a few "rising mast(?)" forklifts out there. Those will punch a hole in the top of a semi it a heartbeat.

Doug in SW IA
 
 
 
Top