Electrical Question

   / Electrical Question #11  
Power = Volts x Amps
 
   / Electrical Question #13  
Watts= Volts x amps

Power = Volts x amps x power factor

Now now, lets not get off down into the inductive or capacitive reactive loads weeds.:) There is always more to the story, but lets just pretend that these load are resistive for our purposes here.:)
 
   / Electrical Question #14  
Watts is the unit of measurement for real power.

I should have said P=VI, as amps is the unit for current.

Resistive Real power has power factor=1
 
   / Electrical Question #15  
Nerd Alert
 
   / Electrical Question #16  
I represent that remark. :laughing:


Course for a 1200w (pf=1) microwave we assume single phase 120v, or else there would be a 1.73 included in the formula. Not aware of 3 phase microwave so a pretty safe assumption.

Nerd off.
 
   / Electrical Question #17  
Whoa, whoa, whoa, lets stop right here, next thing you know we'll be bringing the National Electrical Code, Article 430.24 "Several Motors or a Motor(s) and Other Load(s)" , and having discussions about whether a microwave represents a continuous or non-continuous non-motor load. (Do you plan on microwaving your Christmas turkey for more than 3 continuous hours?)
 
   / Electrical Question
  • Thread Starter
#18  
Whoa, whoa, whoa, lets stop right here, next thing you know we'll be bringing the National Electrical Code, Article 430.24 "Several Motors or a Motor(s) and Other Load(s)" , and having discussions about whether a microwave represents a continuous or non-continuous non-motor load. (Do you plan on microwaving your Christmas turkey for more than 3 continuous hours?)

And this is why I love this site. One very basic question is now going two pages strong. Lots of information that I may or may not ever use but always enjoyable to read.
 
   / Electrical Question #19  
Umm pretty sure microwaves are required to have their own circuit, at least up here. We are supposed to put the micro on it's own 20A circuit. What these folks have currently for a microwave is not necessarily what they will have down the road either. Vent hoods don't take a lot of power, but microwaves do. I tie the vent hood into a light circuit or something else. Leave the micro on it's own circuit.
 
   / Electrical Question #20  
Fridge, dishwasher, microwave and freezer should each have a dedicated circuit.
Add water pumps.
I'd also include a garberater if I used one.

My kitchen uses 12 gauge and only ONE half outlet per breaker, that's 6 outlets and 12 breakers.
We can plug anything in anywhere and all at the same time!
What with waffle irons, toasters, blenders, bread ovens deep friars and whatever new gadget that comes along we should be well prepared.
Also 3 kitchen outlets are routed via the generator switch over panel for those ever so often outages.
 
 
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