Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage

   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #11  
Eddie, I agree. But his problem is again if you stand where the Liberty is parked and look toward the public road, what are you going to do with the water off the left half of the driveway? With a crown/ditch, it ends up going past the corner of his house.

It appears the majority of the problem is the rain water that lands on the driveway.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #12  
There is no crown in the drive and all the fines have washed down to the house. I would add crusher run and grade it with a crown. Concrete is expensive with no maintenance while gravel is the cheapest with the highest maintenance.

Wide ditches - meaningful crown - 4"+ of crusher run.
Won't be cheap.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage
  • Thread Starter
#13  
My house should've been built 8' higher 40 years ago then fill around it, most around town ends up with a flat driveway I lucked out, then some here have a steeper driveway with hot-top then others re-gravel every few years. 25 years ago the driveway was a foot higher then the grass, just have to build it back up next summer, until then I'll hold off buying a Lamborghini. I dont know what the grade is but in the winter time when iced over it's really steep, probably there some here that have a steep driveway even in the summer...
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   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #14  
Thanks for the additional pics. Now I'm more than ever convinced that the driveway needs to slope toward the electric pole, Jeep Wrangler side, run all the water off toward the small sheds in the distance. Much better than having it run toward the house. Between the Liberty and the first tree to the left.

I don't think your driveway can function properly with a crown. Needs to be a one sided slope. To the left when looking at your last pic.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #15  
Your driveway is your ditch... I agree with ovrszd that you need to divert the water toward the jeep. Scrape down that side and move it to where your "ditch" is now. Add more material as needed...
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #16  
Thanks for the additional pics. Now I'm more than ever convinced that the driveway needs to slope toward the electric pole, Jeep Wrangler side, run all the water off toward the small sheds in the distance. Much better than having it run toward the house. Between the Liberty and the first tree to the left.

I don't think your driveway can function properly with a crown. Needs to be a one sided slope. To the left when looking at your last pic.

Yep..... a pitch to one side can be needed when the topography is not suitable for a crown.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #17  
I have had a similar problem, can't ditch for a variety of reasons nor lower the 'hump'.
While crushed run was a decent solution heavy downpours would wash out all the fines.
I discovered re cycled asphalt to be a good solution 20 years ago.
A few weeks back I re did my steepest portion with a 4 inch coverage.
Back then we simply dumped chunks of asphalt and did our best to compact it, Worked!
Now days they mill it so that it looks like crushed stone but it still contains the asphalt components that re glue it under hot sun.
The best part is heavy rains do not wash it out and the more you drive the tighter it bonds.

Another upside it is cheaper that crushed stone. (at least in my area)
Our city also has adopted it for hills on all the gravel roads, they lay about 6 inches but for a drive 3-4 is just fine.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #18  
I have had a similar problem, can't ditch for a variety of reasons nor lower the 'hump'.
While crushed run was a decent solution heavy downpours would wash out all the fines.
I discovered re cycled asphalt to be a good solution 20 years ago.
A few weeks back I re did my steepest portion with a 4 inch coverage.
Back then we simply dumped chunks of asphalt and did our best to compact it, Worked!
Now days they mill it so that it looks like crushed stone but it still contains the asphalt components that re glue it under hot sun.
The best part is heavy rains do not wash it out and the more you drive the tighter it bonds.

Another upside it is cheaper that crushed stone. (at least in my area)
Our city also has adopted it for hills on all the gravel roads, they lay about 6 inches but for a drive 3-4 is just fine.
When you first lay it down, before you compact it, put diesel fuel in a weed spryer and give it a good squirt on a hot day and then compact it and it is almost as good as a paved road from my experience.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #19  
When you first lay it down, before you compact it, put diesel fuel in a weed spryer and give it a good squirt on a hot day and then compact it and it is almost as good as a paved road from my experience.

Oh...heaven forbid!
The environmentalists will be all over you for that suggestion.
 
   / Advice on driveway repair/sloping/drainage #20  
We hear a story of an old man that used to take his old oil and put it on his drive way to keep the dust down in the summer. EPA fined him and he had to remove the top layer of soil and have it disposed of. Later his son had it paved. The first thing they did was to spray down a layer of oil. They can do it but you can't. And I do try and stop my oil leaks and don't want it to kill the grass.
 
 
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