Trailer questions

   / Trailer questions #1  

94BULLITT

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I have a couple of trailer questions. What is the difference between a car trailer and equipment trailer? What is the advantage of a trailer with a tilting deck, a better load angle?
 
   / Trailer questions #2  
Normally the car hauler will have two 5200 lbs axles and the equipment trailer will have 7000 lbs axles. The equipment trailers are usually built more heavily. Keep in mind that they are relative terms so some car haulers can have heavier axles.

You answered correctly to your own second question.
 
   / Trailer questions
  • Thread Starter
#3  
Normally the car hauler will have two 5200 lbs axles and the equipment trailer will have 7000 lbs axles. The equipment trailers are usually built more heavily. Keep in mind that they are relative terms so some car haulers can have heavier axles.

You answered correctly to your own second question.

I have seen some car trailers with 7k axles.
 
   / Trailer questions #4  
I have a couple of trailer questions. What is the difference between a car trailer and equipment trailer? What is the advantage of a trailer with a tilting deck, a better load angle?
Car haulers are lighter duty. I had a 7k that I sold to move up to a 14k. With Tilting decks you don't have to mess around with ramps. If I had to do it over again (and I'm sure I will) I'd get nothing less than a 14k 20' flat deck or deck over.
 
   / Trailer questions #5  
I was considering an equipment trailer for my tractor until I saw dump trailers on the dealer's lot. I was sold! Might be worth checking out for you. Mine is a 7x16 with 10k of carrying capacity (14 gvwr). They are definitely built tough. Plus, it's nice to have the dump feature.
 
   / Trailer questions #6  
My opinion is the length is extremely important. 16' would just not work for me. A 25' deckover
Gooseneck is about perfect and cheaper than a nice dump trailer. Also loading angle is not a factor with a tractor. Who cares if it is steep?
 
   / Trailer questions #7  
In general, regardless of axles, equipment trailers are built heavier. Heavier frame, deck, and tongue. But that is not in all cases.
 
   / Trailer questions #8  
When I was shopping around, the local place had both types of trailers available in 7K or 10K. They called it a car hauler if it had slide-out ramps, or an equipment hauler if it had flip-down ramps. Either one could be spec'd with wood, diamond-plate, or open frame deck. Their descriptions were kind of arbitrary, since the trailers could be customized in any sort of combination.
 
   / Trailer questions #9  
Car haulers usually have a further spaced cross members to make them a tad lighter where as a equipment trailer can take more #'s per sq ft per say.

Just realize on any trailer you must subtract the empty weight from the axle carry capacity to get the payload. A good example is my 32' tri axle trailer weighs 2,800# empty but has 3 5,200# axles so you take the 15,600# worth of axles minus the 2,800# empty weight to get a payload capacity of 12,800#.

Chris
 
   / Trailer questions #10  
Normally the car hauler will have two 5200 lbs axles and the equipment trailer will have 7000 lbs axles. The equipment trailers are usually built more heavily. Keep in mind that they are relative terms so some car haulers can have heavier axles.

My search for a trailer yielded more car haulers with 7K versus 10k ratings.

The main difference between car haulers and equipment trailers seems to be in the design and materials for the deck. Equipment trailers seem to have full-width, heavy wooden decks. Car haulers have decks with no center and just deck material where the wheels would roll. This helps to keep the trailer lighter overall and reduce the need for heavier axles underneath.

Tilt trailers can provide a smoother approach to load equipment and will also have no "rollover clearance" once the front wheels are on the trailer deck. Additionally, tilt trailers have zero need to a beavertail. If you need to have the shortest possible trailer with the longest possible flat surface, a tilt is the answer.

HOWEVER: Loading a towing a 15' piece of gear on wheels is seldom done well / safely on a 16' trailer (because of load distribution). If you're going to get up with an 18' trailer anyway, the beavertail provides no detriment.
 
 
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