Tool for hydraulic coupling

   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #1  

Tony H

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2013
Messages
622
Location
Summit, NY
Tractor
JCB MIDI CX
QUICK-ON

Does anyone in the USA make a tool OR has anyone built there own tool to fight the Hydraulic pressure as you swap out attachments?

Cracking the hoses lose and letting fluid run out is not an option
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #2  
When that is a issue I use threaded or connect under pressure couplers. A lot of the newer skid steers have bleed valves at the connection to bleed pressure back to tank. A jumper hose to introduce air on the implement side helps, a small ball valve on a tee in the bleeder hose works well also. Just catch the fluid in a rag. The pressure connect couplers are the answer. CJ
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #3  
QUICK-ON

Does anyone in the USA make a tool OR has anyone built there own tool to fight the Hydraulic pressure as you swap out attachments?

Cracking the hoses lose and letting fluid run out is not an option

I've read hundreds of posts about people trying to couple their hydraulics, but can't. This looks like the perfect tool!!
Hope it's available here soon. (or, do you know where to get one?)
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #4  
The perfect tool is another QD attach as a dummy QD to prevent any pressure from building.

Cyl's should be retracted on the implement so there is no pressure or load.

You can make two dummy QD's or just one in most cases.

On the end of each dummy, add a small length of PVC tubing that will screw in the threads and stuff it with cotton or rags and add a PVC cap with a small hole in the end.

Any fluid weeping from the hoses will be caught with the dummy QD's.

The tractor side does not usually cause ony problems.
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling
  • Thread Starter
#5  
What I find funny is that these Flush Face 'Dripless' connectors were made because the Environmental folks were angered by the old 'one drip' connectors. I guess they didn't consider this issue or they didn't care.
I just bought a Set of 1/2" connectors. I'm going to put a Tee in between these two connectors with a Valve... When I take off my attachment I will put this on. I guess I will crack the valve open just before putting the attachment back on. I hope the valve can handle whatever pressure builds. It will also serve to keep my connectors clean.
Still keeping my eyes open for this Automobile Valve compression type of tool to be sold in the USA
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #6  
The t between the 2 couplers still allows oil trapped in the system. Allowing oil to flow from A to B lines if both lines are pressurized will do nothing but equalize the pressure. Put the ball valve open ended in the bypass line, then open it before uncoupling the jumper line. That will dump pressure in both lines and allow you to couple up to the attachment. CJ
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #7  
The perfect tool is another QD attach as a dummy QD to prevent any pressure from building.

Cyl's should be retracted on the implement so there is no pressure or load.

You can make two dummy QD's or just one in most cases.

On the end of each dummy, add a small length of PVC tubing that will screw in the threads and stuff it with cotton or rags and add a PVC cap with a small hole in the end.

Any fluid weeping from the hoses will be caught with the dummy QD's.

The tractor side does not usually cause ony problems.

Interesting. So you're saying thread a PVC coupler into a spare QD, add a 6" PVC pipe that is partially filled with a rag, and add a cap that has a small hole drilled in it. Attach one of these to one side of each cylinder on an implement to keep the pressure relieved. I like it!
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #8  
I just cut my engines off and move the control valves to relieve the pressure in the lines.
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #9  
I found that it's not worth having the quick connections and have removed mine. Now I just thread the hoses together when I want to attach my grapple, and plug the hose with a threaded plug when I'm not using it. The time savings is significant, but the frustration factor is gone completely!!!!

Eddie
 
   / Tool for hydraulic coupling #10  
I just cut my engines off and move the control valves to relieve the pressure in the lines.

I do the same, but the issue is with the attachment that has been sitting for some time. Temperature changes can add quite a bit of pressure to the lines on the detached attachment. I usually slip a copper pipe cap over the male end of the QD, cover the whole QD end at with a rag, then rap on the copper cap to release the pressure. I like J_J's suggestion though, and might make up a couple of those.
 
 
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