Struck Gold Today

   / Struck Gold Today #11  
I only use wood for cooking/baking. My favorite around here is Ash. Ash cures quickly, has decent heat output, and does not pop sparks onto food while burning.
 
   / Struck Gold Today #12  
And those balls are fun targets. Some people claim they can be spread around your house to repel spiders, but I don't have any proof of that.

I suspect they do. When we first got married, we moved into an apartment that contained half the cockroaches in the county. After all the spraying and cleaning, we used hedge apples cut in half and placed under sinks, etc. to keep them at a tolerable level. It worked for us. BTW, we used to have a crutch factory here in town and they used Osage Orange to craft their crutches.
 
   / Struck Gold Today #13  
A bit like our Australian Ironbark that is sought after for firewood. My chainsaw sparks on it sometimes. Got a fair bit of Ironbark on my place including a lot of dead ones. Ideal.

I agree wholeheartedly, ironbark is the premium wood!
 
   / Struck Gold Today #14  
And those balls are fun targets. Some people claim they can be spread around your house to repel spiders, but I don't have any proof of that.

Yeah, I know a bunch of people that pick them up off the ground and put them around the inside sills of their basement and they swear that it repels spiders. Well, guess what? Anyone that takes the time to go around the inside sills of their basement to place these things to repel spiders probably also dusts their basement sills once a week, so that's where the spider webs are going. :laughing:

Its been proven that they have no effect on insects. :D
 
   / Struck Gold Today #15  
I suspect they do. When we first got married, we moved into an apartment that contained half the cockroaches in the county. After all the spraying and cleaning, we used hedge apples cut in half and placed under sinks, etc. to keep them at a tolerable level. It worked for us. BTW, we used to have a crutch factory here in town and they used Osage Orange to craft their crutches.

See! Spraying and cleaning. :laughing:
 
   / Struck Gold Today #17  
Looks like you don't want to try and split OO by hand. Looks stringy and tough.
 
   / Struck Gold Today #18  
Holy cow....I'm sitting on a gold mine of firewood and didn't know it! We used these trees for fence posts on the farm. There are posts around easily 75 years old. I've hit them with a front mount dozier blade on a 1486 tractor and most of the time they will grab and pull out of the ground without breaking!
 
   / Struck Gold Today
  • Thread Starter
#19  
Looks like you don't want to try and split OO by hand. Looks stringy and tough.

If it is green I would think it would be very difficult to hand split. Sometimes even with my splitter it will have to be flipped and run the opposite direction. If you knock a couple of pieces of seasoned osage together it almost had a metal sound to it it is so dense. Makes for great fence posts as well. Claims of 30+ years in the ground seem to be common.

It's also extremely clean burning when seasoned properly. Clean orange and blue flames with almost zero smoke. I'm assuming the low smoke is due to how hot the wood burns. Here's a pic of my chimney this morning with a full blown fire in the fireplace. Anyone driving up to the house would never know we were burning wood.



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   / Struck Gold Today #20  
We have Osage here as well as Hawthorne. Most of the hawthorne are fenceline annoyances in that they have long thorns, lots of branches and no nice firewood. This year though there was a blowdown in a tree lot that I cut up. Base was about 18" and it was about 80' tall. In a tree lot they have to grow up to live so when you find one it is great. I think they are harder and more dense than the Osage with a lot of heat in them but they do not burn real well - it works better to burn them with some Oak or something whereas Osage burns great by itself.
 
 
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