Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor?

   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #21  
Releasing compression would not create engine braking, it would simply reduce power output. Limiting exhaust flow provides engine braking. See what Cummins and Jacobs have to say:

https://quickserve.cummins.com/info/qsol/products/newparts/jacobs_md_nondodge.html

Jacobs Vehicle Systems | Exhaust Brakes

It's interesting to me that there's so much confusion regarding Jake brakes. I hate to pick on you here, Rick, but why don't you check this link from the same site you provided above.

Jacobs Vehicle Systems | Compression Release Brake

Since no one else has spelled it out yet, a compression brake system allows the piston to compress air, then before the power stroke, it opens the exhaust valve. Thereby much of the energy from the drive line is converted to pressurized air and then released before it's turned into power. Essentially, when applied, it turns the engine into an air compressor powered by the drive train.

Again, "let's see what Jacobs has to say" about their own product, "How It Works
When activated, the Jacobs Engine Brakeョ opens the exhaust valves near the top of the compression stroke, releasing the highly compressed air through the exhaust system. Little energy is returned to the piston, and as the cycle repeats, the energy of the trucks forward motion is dissipated, causing the truck to slow down." -quote is from the link above.

Exhaust brakes are different. Yes, Jacobs Vehicle Systems makes them, but when truckers, or anyone else using the term correctly says "Jake brakes" they're talking about compression brakes. Like the sign on the highway "compression braking prohibited within city limits". If compression braking "would not create engine braking" they wouldn't use it.
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #22  
Releasing compression would not create engine braking, it would simply reduce power output. Limiting exhaust flow provides engine braking. See what Cummins and Jacobs have to say:

https://quickserve.cummins.com/info/qsol/products/newparts/jacobs_md_nondodge.html

Jacobs Vehicle Systems | Exhaust Brakes

The wikipedia version is packed with incorrect information, including the claim that diesels without an engine brake have less natural engine braking than gas engines. This is patently false because a diesel's higher compression ratio naturally decelerates faster due to the higher energy demands of compressing an equal air volume into less space as compared to a spark ignition engine with equal displacement.

Compression release engine brake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Once again, an 'encyclopedia' that can be edited without qualification gets it wrong. Garbage in, garbage out.
Kinda an extreme reaction to references that havent supported their info fully but arent really wrong.
... Compression/reexpansion of a trapped cyl charge does not take as much energy as does the compression then relief mode. You have an "air spring vs an air pump". ... Even simple compression release - by, like, removing a spark plug will make an engine more difficult to rotate at speed than would leaving in a non firing plug
larry
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #24  
...^ :thumbsup:
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor?
  • Thread Starter
#25  


High gear is NOT for plowing or doing any appreciable work with your tractor. You should use low or medium only, and 4wd for plowing, regardless of level grade. H is for over road travel, medium and low for actual work. 4wd for traction, snow, sand, mud, etc. Differential lock, if equipped, for additional traction, when stuck or nearly stuck, in straight front to back movement, not when turning.
That's the facts, Jack.:thumbsup:*

Refer to red text above.*


First off Coyote, let me say I'm not being argumentative. I appreciate your input and have read much you have posted in this forum.

If I'm up on the level road using the fel to move the snow banks from point A to Point B and I don't need the traction wouldn't it be OK and maybe efficient to use 2wd and high range (the tires aren't slipping and the engine/HST aren't straining or stalling)? I thought the HST would go into relief (right term?) or start to stall the engine if I was overworking it. For pushing snow and heavy lifting I use low range and 4wd if I lose traction. I don't have a plow on the tractor; I plow with the quad and then move the piles out of the way with the FEL.

The last thing I want to do is damage my tractor but I also want to work efficiently. Each storm I end up doing at least 2 neighbors driveways and road frontage. Most with the plow, some snow moving/pushing with the tractor.

Thanks for all the input. I really like my little Kioti and don't want to mistreat him.
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #26  
2wd will be easier on the tractor, especially the tires. The only problem is the obvious loss of traction. The not so obvious issue is the loss of braking traction as tractors don't have front brakes. If lifting something, even something not that heavy, you loose traction on the rears. Generally I leave mine in 2wd unless I might need the traction, braking or am going to lift anything.

Yes a HST should go into relief to protect things, or stall the engine in higher gears. However relying on that relief isn't a good idea. In high gear you are putting more strain on things & have less dynamic braking power. It won't kill anything, but isn't best practice.
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #27  
First off Coyote, let me say I'm not being argumentative. I appreciate your input and have read much you have posted in this forum.

If I'm up on the level road using the fel to move the snow banks from point A to Point B and I don't need the traction wouldn't it be OK and maybe efficient to use 2wd and high range (the tires aren't slipping and the engine/HST aren't straining or stalling)? I thought the HST would go into relief (right term?) or start to stall the engine if I was overworking it. For pushing snow and heavy lifting I use low range and 4wd if I lose traction. I don't have a plow on the tractor; I plow with the quad and then move the piles out of the way with the FEL.

The last thing I want to do is damage my tractor but I also want to work efficiently. Each storm I end up doing at least 2 neighbors driveways and road frontage. Most with the plow, some snow moving/pushing with the tractor.

Thanks for all the input. I really like my little Kioti and don't want to mistreat him.

Buggs67,

Not to worry; I'm not seeing your wanting to know how to best use your tractor as being argumentative in any way.
I made a mistake about your tractor's ranges and wanted to correct my error. Thanks for pointing it out TB Donnely; otherwise I would have mislead you, Buggs67, and possibly others. And I don't want to do that, obviously, it serves no one well.
FWIW, seems I read TB Donnley's PM to me, in my email, and thought it was Buggs67 correcting me on the no High range; which is why I erred when trying to correct my original error, yikes, I got this whole thing so messed up...:) thanks TB for the correction).

Here's what I suggest. Send us some pics of what you're doing and where, and let us see the terrain, etc.
Meantime, I personally would use 4wd to push snow to keep from possible sliding/slipping, etc. that might occur if only in 2wd. Consider this: 4wd is for use on non-dry surfaces, or mud/snow, etc. where extra traction is needed. You HAVE 4wd; I say use it to give you an extra margin of error to protect your tractor and yourself when using it. Why not? You have it, use it. It won't hurt anything, so long as you're not using it on dry surfaces, hard surfaces which are clean, (no snow/ice/mud).
Rather than wait until you're slipping to engage 4wd, or low range, go to 4wd first, then engage low range, if needed for extra control. The relief will kick in if you attempt to go beyond the relief setting while doing whatever work. I would again see what works best in terms of range and especially throttle speed/RPMs and let the relief take care of itself. Try to work within its limits and not try to work to its limit. The more hours you use your tractor the less you should hit the relief limit. Hope this helps.
for instance, I am in 4wd almost all the time in winter; I have long steep curving driveways, gravel under packed snow and ice, and my use of 2wd is therefore almost non-existent. I also use aggressive chains, when needed to keep me from slipping off the roadbed into the ditch, which I did last winter because I was too lazy to install the chains yet and was plowing alongside my road between my properties and got a rear tire over the embankment, with my backhoe and plow on. That was it for a day & 1/2 of digging by hand, and trying to pull her out with a pickup - no chance; and eventually having to ask for help from my down the road neighbor with a smaller Kubota. He was very helpful, but even so it was a major effort to get me back up the embankment and onto the road.
Guess I didn't heed the complete message though; so far I'm still without chains this winter, and have yet another storm coming tomorrow that could make me regret this decision.:eek::confused3:

Do as I say- not as I do!:laughing:
 
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   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #28  
When clearing a half mile of gravel road if I can get up to 7 to 8 mph the snow flows better and farther and that speed requires high range and 4wd. Heavy snow is another matter.
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #29  
I made a mistake about your tractor's ranges and wanted to correct my error. Thanks for pointing it out TB Donnely; otherwise I would have mislead you, Buggs67, and possibly others. And I don't want to do that, obviously, it serves no one well.
FWIW, seems I read TB Donnley's PM to me, in my email, and thought it was Buggs67 correcting me on the no High range; which is why I erred when trying to correct my original error, yikes, I got this whole thing so messed up...:) thanks TB for the correction).


Since you've been blanketed with multiple snow storms measured in feet rather than inches you have earned yourself a 'bye'! :laughing:

Don
 
   / Possible to over-rev my diesel tractor? #30  
When clearing a half mile of gravel road if I can get up to 7 to 8 mph the snow flows better and farther and that speed requires high range and 4wd. Heavy snow is another matter.

I have had success, by increasing the angle of the blade to get a better flow off the blade.
 
 
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