fd

   / fd #11  
I agree with Rick first determine it is in fact over heating. I would also look closely at the temp sensor wiring.
 
   / fd #12  
I agree with the suggestion to verify it is actually overheating with a different thermometer. While you’re checking with the second thermometer check to see if the radiator is at the similar temperature as the engine or if it’s way cooler. If the radiator is at similar temperature as the engine you’ve got an airflow problem. Probably because it’s dirty. If the radiator is way cooler you’ve got a coolant circulation problem.
 
   / fd #15  
Had the same problem in a high mileage chevy PU. It had been about 150-200k miles since I had done anything more than coolant swaps and hose replacements. Started running hot, by the gage. Got ready to do a water pump but a friend came by with his laser pyrometer. Water outlet was 195-200. Nice differential on the hoses. Radiator tank top 190 ish. replaced the electronic sender with a capillary tube gage and it is still good.
 
   / fd #16  
Those ford engines have problems with cavitation, seen many for sale with a blown head gasket witch turn out to be internal leaks in the engine block. If you get oil on the water but not water in the oil you might have a leak from a the pressurised part of the lubrication system. But check all other possibilities first.
 
   / fd #17  
I was pulling a head gasket a couple months ago, and there was a nice slick of oil all over the inside of the engine.
 
Last edited:
   / fd #18  
They are called impellers and yes, they do fail. All we know now is the gauge is reading an overheat condition. Nothing has verified an actual overheat has occurred. Let's get there before we do anything else.
We have a tractor dealership here in business since 1944 same people run it still. 100 mile radius area. Four mechanics. I was one of the four. If it cranks evenly and starts easy, after water pump verified good, injector pump timing may be off. He probably can't check compression. But he hasn't said it boils any water out. Those gauges usually work or they don't. Never seen a false read. Morning before last I was held up at the truck stop. Fella wants his temp gauge fixed on his John Deere.
 
   / fd #19  
We have a tractor dealership here in business since 1944 same people run it still. 100 mile radius area. Four mechanics. I was one of the four. If it cranks evenly and starts easy, after water pump verified good, injector pump timing may be off. He probably can't check compression. But he hasn't said it boils any water out. Those gauges usually work or they don't. Never seen a false read. Morning before last I was held up at the truck stop. Fella wants his temp gauge fixed on his John Deere.
My experience in 26 years wrenching on and selling parts for Ford tractors and other brands differs.
The temps and gauge readings reported by the OP fully support my troubleshooting strategy. There is no overheating condition. The gauge may not have failed. The power supply and or cluster ground paths are at least as likely to be at fault.
 
   / fd #20  
Heres another cheap easy check…Grab the fan blade (tractor ignition switch off) and try to turn it. If you can turnthe fan without turning the engine, the belt isn’t gripping enough. If the engine rolls over with the fan, consider the belt good.
Now, in the shop or on an overcast day, slip a trouble light in behind the radiator, by the fan blades. Go around front and look for light. You should be able to see the illumination quite plainly thru the fins. If you can’t see the light plainly, the radiator is clogged with chaff, dirt, thistle fuzz, etc and needs to be cleaned until you CAN see light thru it.
These are cheap, quick, and easy checks to do before you pull something apart and throw $$ at it until you discover the radiator was plugged all along.
 
 
Top