Are we in the USA really this far behind?

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   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #61  
I don’t think anyone in Western technology is far ahead or far behind. Simply, every design bureau gets the technical tasks and works the way as required. In this case, if the task were to create a tractor with a low center of gravity, maneuverable on narrow and winding roads, having good traction and sufficient power, (...), the offices of all well-known manufacturers in the West would create a tractor no worse then those in a video.
That's my thought. :)(y)
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #62  
Most all US manufacturers at onetime or another built some kind of specialty tractor or packages that were used for power for other machines. Most of the specialty tractors were of a European design, some were changes made to standard production tractors. Even some were designed and built by people who thought they could sell their tractor. (Steiner for one). Most of the European designs were usually designed for vineyard, orchard or close area work. Yes there are some very useful builds that would could be used here but until they are imported the price is unreasonable.
US manufacturers used to make some very nice small tractors, but due to labor and material costs they found they could import Asian built tractors cheaper. After other Asian manufacturers found what the US manufacturers were doing they started sending their units here to. Some made out well some not so. Even the Russian's got in on it.
Now some people have a chunk of iron that has established dealers and kept there brand going, some had established dealers and folded, some found a marketing firm to sell and have no support. As I call the a "one time use" use it until it breaks.
Some of the specialty tractors were only marketed in certain areas and were not advertised out of that area, so most people were not aware they were ever built.
Packages include JD 50 for Barber Greene, MM packages 78, 79, 80, 81 for West Corporation on the Sky Trak, Oliver made 770 and 880 series for Lull Corporation for their brick lifts, I know the are others I don't know about.
Specialty tractors were as I said before were often made for vineyard or orchard work. Versatile made a bidirectional tractor that Ford got a hold of.
Just remember most of the European designs are good for the use they were designed but we Americans often want to do more with them than what they were designed to do.
Most all US manufacturers at onetime or another built some kind of specialty tractor or packages that were used for power for other machines. Most of the specialty tractors were of a European design, some were changes made to standard production tractors. Even some were designed and built by people who thought they could sell their tractor. (Steiner for one). Most of the European designs were usually designed for vineyard, orchard or close area work. Yes there are some very useful builds that would could be used here but until they are imported the price is unreasonable.
US manufacturers used to make some very nice small tractors, but due to labor and material costs they found they could import Asian built tractors cheaper. After other Asian manufacturers found what the US manufacturers were doing they started sending their units here to. Some made out well some not so. Even the Russian's got in on it.
Now some people have a chunk of iron that has established dealers and kept there brand going, some had established dealers and folded, some found a marketing firm to sell and have no support. As I call the a "one time use" use it until it breaks.
Some of the specialty tractors were only marketed in certain areas and were not advertised out of that area, so most people were not aware they were ever built.
Packages include JD 50 for Barber Greene, MM packages 78, 79, 80, 81 for West Corporation on the Sky Trak, Oliver made 770 and 880 series for Lull Corporation for their brick lifts, I know the are others I don't know about.
Specialty tractors were as I said before were often made for vineyard or orchard work. Versatile made a bidirectional tractor that Ford got a hold of.
Just remember most of the European designs are good for the use they were designed but we Americans often want to do more with them than what they were designed to do.
I have a Italian vineyard but mine does not articulate. Mine has 4 wheel steering, 4 wheel drive and you drive forward or backward just rotate the seat. Step on a pedal and lock both front and back axel and it petty hard to stop it. A very handy tractor.
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #63  
This is the only Goldoni I've ever saw. It was in Baghdad Iraq.

View attachment 728684
And here is the green version of that very same tractor, well, it's actually the 50HP one, but you get the idea. These things had front diff lock along with a very sophisticated, for that era, electronic 3 pt hitch position and draft control. I believe some had a 16x16 transmission and maybe some with a 24x24 transmission. Hydraulic brake valve for trailers were also a common feature.

image;s=644x461
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #64  
I think the difference in tractor designs and ingenuity is driven by farming mentality. The US is a fairly young country that had plenty of land to expand to, while other countries may have limited open/flat land to chose from. The only option they have is to come up with inventive ideas (thinking outside the box) to be able to farm on hills or in tight spaces. They don't have room to build a giant shed to house every type of tractor. They would rather design a tractor that will do about every job so a big shed doesn't cover valuable property.
Here in Norway only 3% of the land are farmland, and historical almost all area that could be used was used.
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #65  
1641839449664.png


This is the American Version.

Even produced in Fargo North Dakota for a spell.

"You want Articulated?, You can't handle articulated" ;-)
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #66  
This thread may highlight more of a marketing challenge than technology issue in the USA.

I have a 60 year old made in the US - Massey Ferguson 35 that still runs great and gets some use...and I can get parts for.

BUT - not many >100HP tractors are made in the states now. So it is not really US technology that is behind. We are not even in the SCUT/CUT/MINI game at this point!

Two years ago, I added a Kubota 60hp with a FEL, which I believe will last 25 years and still have parts available, though it's not high fashion nor a trend setter.

For many, the key decision is long-term reliability and support...

.

I think fundamentally it is simply marketing of European style tractors that is behind in the USA.

Kubota, Deere, LS, Kioti, MF, New Holland, are generally paint and dealer differences, not really technology differences. It is ASIA/PAC that is behind on the tractor fashion and technology curve.

Americans would kick the tires and eventually buy Euro style tractors if they were proven to be useful, supported and reliable (not intending to imply they aren't).

It would be interesting to see someone open up a European tractor distribution channel...but it would take a trusted supplier with a long-term $$ commitment to be successful.

..//TJ
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #67  
And here is the green version of that very same tractor, well, it's actually the 50HP one, but you get the idea. These things had front diff lock along with a very sophisticated, for that era, electronic 3 pt hitch position and draft control. I believe some had a 16x16 transmission and maybe some with a 24x24 transmission. Hydraulic brake valve for trailers were also a common feature.

image;s=644x461
Good stuff Pedro!!!! Thanks!!!
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #68  
Americans would kick the tires and eventually buy Euro style tractors if they were proven to be useful, supported and reliable (not intending to imply they aren't).


..//TJ
A couple decades ago JD moved away from the old American standard design of long wheel base, cab rearward tractors that we knew from the era of the JD 4020 or IH 806.

The change brought short wheel based, cab forward design. The design that had been used in Europe for quite awhile
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #69  
View attachment 728692

This is the American Version.

Even produced in Fargo North Dakota for a spell.

"You want Articulated?, You can't handle articulated" ;-)
Yeah, American's go bigger while other countries must design better for land and conditions other than what is behind the big green Panther. All the while america is losing small farms at a record pace.
 
   / Are we in the USA really this far behind? #70  
America is not Portugal, or Sweden, or Italy. American products are developed for our needs and market. And for our wallet. You won't see too many Dodge Rams with Hemis or Cummins parked in shopping centers in Europe. And you won't see those specialized little tractors harvesting hundreds and thousands of acres in the mid-west. We have specialized vehicles, but sometimes it's not economical to develop them. it's better to import them from those who specialize in producing them.

I get very tired of Europeans telling us what is wrong with us. Few have ever been here and cannot consieve of the great distances and huge farms in this country.

Even more, I'm tired of Americans bashing America. We are not like Sweden, or Portugal, et al. We are like America.
 
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