Tell us something we don’t know.

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#5,811  
At the Mopar Nationals years ago I saw a top fuel dragster making practice runs. They launched and shut down at about 200 feet. I don’t remember the exact numbers but he crossed the finish line at something like 80 mph, which is slower than a lot of street cars. His time was something like 9 seconds though which is faster than almost all street cars.
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,812  
Don’t shoot your self down!

Not every military test pilot can set records like Chuck Yeager, but what happened to Tom Attridge on Sept. 21, 1956, was truly remarkable: He shot down his own aircraft, midflight.

As Attridge settled into the cockpit for his second test flight of the day nearly seven decades ago, he was at the controls of the Navy's first supersonic fighter jet, the Grumman F-11F Tiger. Conceived as a way to modernize the F9F-6/7 Cougar by reducing drag and increasing speed, the Navy was so impressed with its maiden flight that it placed an order for more than 400.

Attridge took off from Grumman's airfield on Long Island, New York, to perform a weapons test over the Atlantic Ocean, piloting his Tiger to an altitude of 20,000 feet. Attridge then began a Mach 1 dive, and with the jet at about 13,000 feet, he fired a four-second round from his 20mm cannons. After a few seconds, Attridge fired again, continuing his descent.

At 7,000 feet, a loud smack signaled the first sign of trouble. Attridge thought a bird had struck his windshield, but he also noticed his plane was losing power.
Attridge throttled his Tiger to about 230 mph and began his return to the airfield. He tried to maintain altitude, but the plane was functioning at only four-fifths of its total power. With the engine sounding like it was “tearing up,” Attridge lost power entirely about two miles from the runway. The Tiger caught fire and lost a wing and stabilizer, forcing Attridge to eject.

The Tiger landed in a bunch of trees less than a mile from the landing strip, then went another 300 feet before stopping. Bullet holes were found to the canopy glass, right engine and nose cone; a bullet was lodged in the engine's compressor. The plane was deemed a total loss.

Attridge broke a leg and several vertebrae, but all things considered, he was a lucky man. The plane was firing only dummy practice rounds; had they been real bullets, “it’s unlikely the pilot would have survived either the hit to the canopy glass or the hit to the plane’s engine,” according to We Are the Mighty.
So how was this even possible? It seems implausible that a plane can somehow catch up to a bullet it fired. A projectile can travel so much faster, some even reaching more than twice the speed of sound.

The Blue Angels, the U.S. Navy’s flight demonstration team, flew the F11F Tiger from 1957-69.
The rounds fired by Attridge were traveling at about 2,000 mph. Because the bullets slowed down greatly because of the drag induced by air resistance, they began a downward curve. While their speed dropped to about 400 mph, Attridge accelerated the Tiger to about 880 mph.

As both the plane and bullets descended -- and one was slowing down as the other was speeding up -- the difference in distance was erased. Their paths intersected a few miles after Attridge fired the rounds. It took 11 seconds from the time the bullets were fired to when they struck the Tiger.

While the Navy dismissed the incident as a "million to one shot," Attridge was skeptical. "At the speeds we're flying today, it could be duplicated anytime," he later said.

If anyone would know about such things, it would be Attridge -- and he was right. In 1973, another test pilot ejected safely after his F-14 Tomcat in California was hit by its own (dummy) missile.

For all of its promise, the Tiger was in service only from 1957 to 1969. It is known for setting an altitude record, for its use by the Navy's Blue Angels flight demonstration team, and for a man who went where no test pilot had gone before -- right into the path of his own bullets.
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,813  
...

An NHRA Top Fuel Dragster accelerates quicker than any other land vehicle on earth quicker than a jet fighter plane . . . quicker than the space shuttle.
I read that about the space shuttle in the past. However, top end is a real bear at 17,500mph. :)
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,814  
The difference in the weight of a Tesla EV with a fully discharged battery and with it's battery fully charged is 4/1,000,000 of a gram.
I always wondered how much smoke weighed.

IMG_2819.jpeg
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,815  
I always wondered how much smoke weighed.

View attachment 823255
Oh, c'mon... every kid who ever played with Lionel trains could've told you that! :D

1695677277195.png

BTW, that image comes from an ebay listing at $150 for that bottle. Makes me think I probably shouldn't be letting my 10 year old use mine each Christmas, the bottle I have might be ca.1950.
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,816  
JPMorgan & Chase (JPM) said Tuesday it reached an agreement with the US Virgin Islands to settle a lawsuit alleging that the bank participated in a sex trafficking venture headed by Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who died in a Manhattan jail in 2019 by suicide.

The country's largest bank will pay $75 million to end the litigation, with $55 million going to charities and assisting victims while the other $20 million will pay attorney fees of law firm Motley Rice.
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,817  
JPMorgan & Chase (JPM) said Tuesday it reached an agreement with the US Virgin Islands to settle a lawsuit alleging that the bank participated in a sex trafficking venture headed by Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who died in a Manhattan jail in 2019 by suicide.

The country's largest bank will pay $75 million to end the litigation, with $55 million going to charities and assisting victims while the other $20 million will pay attorney fees of law firm Motley Rice.
Wow, that's like almost a years pay for the top execs.
Do you have a link to the article?
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,818  
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Wow, that's like almost a years pay for the top execs.
I was surprised to see their top salaries as low as they are, I guess we've been jaded by the too-public salaries of various tech and entertainment company CO's. The CEO of JPM reportedly makes only $31.5 million in total compensation, which I could certainly live on, but it's not nearly as high as I had expected.
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,819  
Jamie Dimon CEO JPM net worth 1.7 billion USD
His pay is pocket change
 
   / Tell us something we don’t know. #5,820  
JPMorgan & Chase (JPM) said Tuesday it reached an agreement with the US Virgin Islands to settle a lawsuit alleging that the bank participated in a sex trafficking venture headed by Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted sex offender who died in a Manhattan jail in 2019 by suicide.

The country's largest bank will pay $75 million to end the litigation, with $55 million going to charities and assisting victims while the other $20 million will pay attorney fees of law firm Motley Rice.
For something that we all know went on but nobody is talking, including our "intelligence" community. It must be their friends and not OMB or they'd be leaking the info.
 
 
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