Blend door actuators.

   / Blend door actuators. #1  

dodge man

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Joined
Oct 25, 2008
Messages
11,286
Location
West central Illinois
Tractor
JD 2025R
I replaced two of the blend door actuators on my 2010 Challenger today. Car has 22,000 miles on it. I drove it to town yesterday and no heat. I think only one was bad but I did both while I was in there. You have to stand on your head to change one of them. Apparently they sharpen everything under the dash because I darn near needed a blood transfusion afterwards. Took me about 3 1/2 hours, about $75. I did one several years ago on my daughters Impala and it was behind the glove box but still took a while to do. I don’t know why some of these parts are so cheaply made.

My wife thought the first picture was funny, the second picture shows the scrapes, the other arm was worse.
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   / Blend door actuators. #2  
You have to be a real contortionist to do some of the work on cars.
 
   / Blend door actuators. #3  
i learned real fast its easier and better for my back to just remove the seat completely, its usually only 4 bolts and a couple electrical connectors.
 
   / Blend door actuators. #4  
I changed the heat/blend door motor on my GMC pickup a couple of years ago. It's toward the bottom so it wasn't too bad of a job. As I recall, less than half an hour. The knock sensors were a different story though. 😵‍💫
 
   / Blend door actuators. #6  
I replaced two of the blend door actuators on my 2010 Challenger today. Car has 22,000 miles on it. I drove it to town yesterday and no heat. I think only one was bad but I did both while I was in there. You have to stand on your head to change one of them. Apparently they sharpen everything under the dash because I darn near needed a blood transfusion afterwards. Took me about 3 1/2 hours, about $75. I did one several years ago on my daughters Impala and it was behind the glove box but still took a while to do. I don’t know why some of these parts are so cheaply made.

My wife thought the first picture was funny, the second picture shows the scrapes, the other arm was worse.
View attachment 768335View attachment 768336
It should last a while at only about 1800 miles/year.
 
   / Blend door actuators. #7  
Yeah, I think they look around for vendors than can supply stamped metal parts with the most razor sharp edges. Had to adjust the headlights on the GF's 2014 Optima and my left hand looks like yours does.
 
   / Blend door actuators. #8  
I tried the blend door on my 09 Grand Marquis. After struggling for several hours with my 2x hands I had to give up and turn it over to the neighborhood mechanic who took several hours with all of the right tools and know how. Inexpensive part but expensive labor.
 
   / Blend door actuators. #9  
I replaced two of the blend door actuators on my 2010 Challenger today. Car has 22,000 miles on it. I drove it to town yesterday and no heat. I think only one was bad but I did both while I was in there. You have to stand on your head to change one of them. Apparently they sharpen everything under the dash because I darn near needed a blood transfusion afterwards. Took me about 3 1/2 hours, about $75. I did one several years ago on my daughters Impala and it was behind the glove box but still took a while to do. I don’t know why some of these parts are so cheaply made.

My wife thought the first picture was funny, the second picture shows the scrapes, the other arm was worse.
View attachment 768335View attachment 768336
Our 2013 Impala has one that's bad. I'm not wanting to change it, but winter's almost hear and I'd hate to have it stuck on some setting where defrost or heat won't work. My mechanic says I can do it myself, so maybe I'll look at it tomorrow..... or not. 🙃
 
   / Blend door actuators.
  • Thread Starter
#10  
I’m going by memory, I think my daughters car was a 2010, but the one I changed was behind the glove box. I didn’t have to stand on my head, I could sit in the seat. I think there was 3 bolts that held it in, and not exaggerating, I spent 30 minutes or more taking one of those three bolts in and putting it back in. I tried every wrench and socket I owned. I think I just used an open end wrench and could turn it a tiny bit, flip it over, then turn it a little more.

I think I also had to change the little resistor box that controlled the blower speed on that car, it was pretty easy to get to. Also the front door speakers and the power door lock actuator on the back door.
 
 
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